Madrid bombing suspect on trial for selling explosives

23rd October 2006, Comments 0 comments

23 October 2006, MADRID — One of those accused in connection with the Madrid train bombings went on trial on Monday for trafficking drugs and explosives.

23 October 2006

MADRID — One of those accused in connection with the Madrid train bombings went on trial on Monday for trafficking drugs and explosives.

Emilio Suarez Trashorras and his brother-in-law Antonio Toro are alleged to have form part of gang involved in selling drugs and explosives.

As the trial opened in Gijon, in northern Spain, both men faced up to 17 years in jail if convicted.

Trashorras is separately accused of supplying dynamite used by Islamic extremists in the Madrid train bombings which killed 191 people in March 2004.

Trashorras and Toro were arrested as part of Operation Pipol after police seized 86 kilogrammes of cannabis, three kilogrammes of cocaine and other drugs, plus 16 cartridges of Goma 2 and 94 industrial detonators.

Toro allegedly worked for the leader of the gang, Marcs Barreiro Magan, 29, and had to transport cocaine and cannabis throughout Galicia.

Trashorras was said to have helped in buying and selling the drugs by renting vehicles.

The Goma 2 and the detonators seized by police were said to have come from mines in Asturias, where Trashorras had worked.

Both Toro and Trashorras are accused of trying to sell dynamite to Francisco Lavandera Villazón, alias Lavandera, who worked in the Horoscope Club in Gijon and who was an informer for the Civil Guard.

He tipped off police about the gang in the summer of 2001.

Trashorras and Toro have been transferred from a prison in Madrid to Gijon for the trial amid high security.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news 

23 October 2006

MADRID — One of those accused in connection with the Madrid train bombings went on trial on Monday for trafficking drugs and explosives.

Emilio Suarez Trashorras and his brother-in-law Antonio Toro are alleged to have form part of gang involved in selling drugs and explosives.

As the trial opened in Gijon, in northern Spain, both men faced up to 17 years in jail if convicted.

Trashorras is separately accused of supplying dynamite used by Islamic extremists in the Madrid train bombings which killed 191 people in March 2004.

Trashorras and Toro were arrested as part of Operation Pipol after police seized 86 kilogrammes of cannabis, three kilogrammes of cocaine and other drugs, plus 16 cartridges of Goma 2 and 94 industrial detonators.

Toro allegedly worked for the leader of the gang, Marcs Barreiro Magan, 29, and had to transport cocaine and cannabis throughout Galicia.

Trashorras was said to have helped in buying and selling the drugs by renting vehicles.

The Goma 2 and the detonators seized by police were said to have come from mines in Asturias, where Trashorras had worked.

Both Toro and Trashorras are accused of trying to sell dynamite to Francisco Lavandera Villazón, alias Lavandera, who worked in the Horoscope Club in Gijon and who was an informer for the Civil Guard.

He tipped off police about the gang in the summer of 2001.

Trashorras and Toro have been transferred from a prison in Madrid to Gijon for the trial amid high security.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news 

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