Inquiry member 'interfering'in Madrid terror investigation

8th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

8 October 2004, MADRID - The judge leading the investigation into the Madrid terrorist attacks criticised Friday a member of the all-party inquiry into the bombings for "interfering".

8 October 2004

MADRID - The judge leading the investigation into the Madrid terrorist attacks criticised Friday a member of the all-party inquiry into the bombings for "interfering".

Judge Juan del Olmo said opposition Popular Party deputy Jaime Ignacio del Burgo had interfered and disturbed the "normal course of non-involvement in judicial proceedings".

The Spanish attorney general Candido Conde-Pumpido also criticised Burgo.

The move comes after it emerged Burgo had sent a questionnaire to one of the suspects in the 11 March bombing inquiry, Rafa Zouhier, who is currently being held in jail.

Burgo is one of the members of the all-party inquiry into the events surrounding the bombings in which 191 people were murdered and more than 1,500 people injured when ten bombs went off on four rush-hour trains.

Burgo has also been censured by the other members of the inquiry.

Zouhier, a former police informant, has made a number of allegations about lack of police action in the days before the bombings – all of which have been denied.

Spanish prime minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero and former premier Jose Maria Aznar will both appear before the parliamentary commission next month.

Both appearances will be eagerly awaited as the commission has been criticised for failing to get to the bottom of the events surrounding the bombings in which 191 people were killed.

Critics have claimed that the commission lacks the investigative drive which characterised the 9/11 inquiry in the US.

They claim that it has failed to get to the bottom of what really happened and seems hampered by party-political squabbling.

The purpose of the inquiry is to examine the events surrounding the 11 March bombings.

Aznar's government lost the general election three days following the terrorist atrocity after many voters appeared to believe the former Popular Party administration refused to blame Islamic terrorists in case it would backfire on them in the elections.

Instead, they continued to blame ETA, the Basque terrorist group, in an apparent effort to deflect attention from the fact the bombings were launched because of Spain's support for the Iraq war.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news
 

 

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