Gypsy soul conquers the Culture Ministry

26th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

26 November 2007, Madrid - Among the winners of this year's INAEM Culture Ministry awards, announced throughout the month of November, are flamenco singer Miguel Póveda and writer Ana María Matute.

26 November 2007

Madrid - Among the winners of this year's INAEM Culture Ministry awards, announced throughout the month of November, are flamenco singer Miguel Póveda and writer Ana María Matute.

"Any prize is a motivation, but this one is a challenge: from now on I will have to live up to the National Music Prize, which is a lot," said the 34-year-old singer on Thursday.

Póveda began singing 20 years ago, but his career took off after winning the 1993 Cante de la Mina competition, considered the most prestigious in the flamenco world.

Póveda has appeared in two films this year: Carlos Saura's 'Fados', and thriller 'Heartbeat Detector' by Nicolas Klotz. Last year's 'Tierra de Calma' album is up for a Latin Grammy.

While Jorge Fernandez Guerra, director of the Alicante-based Center for the Diffusion of Contemporary Music and the city's annual contemporary music festival, won the composition section of the National Music Prize, Ana María Matute was awarded the National Prize for Spanish Literature for her lifetime's work. The 82-year-old said the news was a complete surprise: "the rumor mill wasn't working this year."

Still recovering from a fractured femur, she welcomed the €30,000 prize money, saying it would help her finish her latest novel, 'Paraíso inhabitado' (Uninhabited paradise) which is due out next spring.

Others honored with Culture Ministry national prizes this year have been Carmen Werner and Manuela Carrasco, who carried off the dance awards. Werner, dancer and director of the Provisional de Danza company won the creation prize, and Carrasco the performance award.

Juan Mayorga was awarded the National Theater Prize in recognition of "his decisive contribution to Spanish playwriting, and deep involvement in the creative process of theater, to which he has contributed as both author and adaptor," said INAEM director Juan Carlos Marset.

Juggler Francisco Tébar Honrrubia, better known by his stage name of 'Picasso Junior', won the National Circus Prize, for the international attention garnered by the Circo Roncalli.

Manuel Vilariño was awarded the Photography Prize "in recognition of his personal career, which has used photography to reflect the cycle of life and our sense of time through his passionate observation of nature," said Marset.

Finally, graphic artist Francesc Capdevila, who uses the penname of 'Max', won the National Comic Prize for his 'Hechos, dichos, ocurrencias and andanzas de Bardín, el superrealista' (Deeds, Sayings, Notions and Wanderings of Bardín the Superrealist.)

[Copyright EL PAÍS, SL. 2007]

Subject: Spanish news

 

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