Greenpeace hits out at 'saturated' Spanish costas

5th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

5 July 2005, MADRID — The environmental pressure group Greenpeace has condemned the ecological damage caused by the relentless building work along the Spanish Mediterranean coasts.

5 July 2005

MADRID — The environmental pressure group Greenpeace has condemned the ecological damage caused by the relentless building work along the Spanish Mediterranean coasts.

In a report, the group said in the last year 768,000 new houses, 58 new golf courses and 77 sporting clubs have been approved.

Greenpeace also claimed that 44,900 illegal homes were constructed and 88 cases of contamination were the result.

The report, called 'Destruction of the Costas 2005', details the dmange which the coastline and the sea have experienced because of human activity.

It highlights the massive degree of building, contamination and new port infrastructures.

The report said: "The degradation was due to human activities which traditionally damage areas in which they occur."

It pointed to problems of contamination, massive urban development, over-exploitation of fish stocks and the way the rivers have been altered to accommodate building work.

The report said all these factors "amplify the ecological impact and put the coastal area in a precarious situation".

It details problems in each area of Spain, but says in general its coast has been damaged by urbanisation, tourism and work on the coast, like the construction of new ports.

Greenpeace says in the past five years, urbanisation on Spain's coast has risen by 25.4 percent.

It adds: "This is an implacable phenomenon which has been going on for forty years."

It also says it is affecting the coast of Almeria, Cadiz, Huelva, and the Cantabria in northern Spain where property developers try "to sell homes on the last metre of virgin coast".

The report concluded Spain's coast is "completely saturated" with 34 percent of the first kilometre inland urbanized.

In areas like Melilla, Malaga or Barcelona this figure extends to 50 percent.

It attacked municipal bad management which has allowed illegal homes to be built, pointing to the example of Marbella, where 20,000 homes and 270 construction licences were granted by the regional government of Andalusia.

The traditional 'sun and beach' tourism has become stagnant because of the excessive use of resources – space, water, and electricity and the degradation of the environment, the report added.

Greenpeace highlighted the rise in the number of homes linked to golf courses. It said in the last few months, 77 new golf courses on top of the 300 which already exist had been built.

It said: "This is does not benefit tourism and does not generate an economically sustainable model."

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

0 Comments To This Article