Film festival has anti-establishment theme

21st September 2004, Comments 0 comments

21 September 2004, SAN SEBASTIAN - Works by Buñuel and Dali, Pasolini and Monthy Python are among the 34 films of the San Sebastian Film Festival's "Incorrect" selection, it was revealed Tuesday.

21 September 2004

SAN SEBASTIAN - Works by Buñuel and Dali, Pasolini and Monthy Python are among the 34 films of the San Sebastian Film Festival's "Incorrect" selection, it was revealed Tuesday.

This section of the week-long festival is dedicated to films which got under the establishment's skin at the time they premiered with their biting criticisms of society.

The festival's organisers chose movies that criticised the injustices of society or openly poked fun at its myths and taboos - and which are still relevant today.

An example is "Duck Soup" (1933) in which the Marx Brothers laughed at politics and gave a scathing take on the stupidity of war.

The oldest movie in the series is "The Golden Age" (1930) by Spaniard Luis Buñuel, the king of surreal cinema who wrote the piece along with painter and iconoclast Salvador Dali.

The film was the most antireligious of his works, and its screening was only authorized because it was presented as a crazy man's dream, thus making it acceptable to depict a delighted Jesus Christ participating in an orgy.

Also being screened at the festival is Buñuel's unfinished movie "Simon of the Desert" (1965) which marked the end of the Mexican phase of his career.

After this film, Buñuel was accused of blasphemy for poking fun at the Christian tale of Simon Stylites, a hermit who spent the last 37 years of his life perched atop a pillar in the Syrian desert.

Pier Paolo Pasolini is represented by "Salo," and Monty Python's "The Life of Brian" will also be shown.

But the most irreverent films include Spanish movies like Pedro Almodovar's "Pepi, Luci, Bom and Other Girls on the Heap," Ivan Zulueta's "Rapture" and Luis Garcia Berlanga's "The Teacher's Dream."

Despite the vintage productions, most films in the "Incorrect" selection belong to more recent times, such as Michael Moore's incisive "Roger and Me," the imaginative "Delirious World of the Feebles" by Peter Jackson, and the black humour of Jean Pierre Sinapi's "National 7."

The selection would not be complete, of course, without a movie from Woody Allen, particularly in a festival that has premiered his latest film "Melinda and Melinda" and honoured him with the Donostia lifetime-achievement award.

Allen's television movie "Don't Drink the Water," (1994) a comedy about life behind the cold-war iron curtain, is featured in the "Incorrect" selection.

The controversial screenings will also include the satirical cartoon "South Park" and Tom Roth's movie about incest titled "The War Zone," the only film the actor has directed.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

 

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