Extremist says he killed boy after "Nazi" taunts

15th November 2007, Comments 0 comments

15 November 2007, Madrid - Josué Estébanez de la Hija, a 24-year-old soldier, has admitted before a judge to killing a 16-year-old boy in a Madrid subway train on Sunday, saying he acted out of fear when confronted by a group of people calling him a "Nazi."

15 November 2007

Madrid - Josué Estébanez de la Hija, a 24-year-old soldier, has admitted before a judge to killing a 16-year-old boy in a Madrid subway train on Sunday, saying he acted out of fear when confronted by a group of people calling him a "Nazi."

Estébanez de la Hija, a right-wing extremist who had been on his way to attend an anti-immigration rally in the center of the capital, said he had been provoked into pulling out a knife and stabbing the boy, whose name was released by police as Carlos Javier P. The victim died almost instantly when the 25-centimeter blade penetrated his heart.

Estébanez de la Hija also injured two other people who confronted him, all of whom had been planning to attend an anti-fascist counter protest. The incident was recorded by the train's security cameras.

"He said he didn't want to kill anybody, but acted out of fear," a court source said after the preliminary hearing on Tuesday. "He didn't say that the anti-fascist group attacked him first, but that they scared him until fear overcame him," the source added. The judge remanded Estébanez de la Hija in custody.

The murder, triggered by an ideological confrontation on the sidelines of rival protests, has led city officials to clamp down on demonstrations expressing extremist views. In the view of Madrid authorities, the need for such action was further underscored hours after the murder on Sunday when anti-fascist youths rioted in the central Malasaña district, breaking bank windows, setting fire to garbage containers and battling with police.

In light of the violence, Soledad Mestre, the central government's top official for the Madrid region, has since banned two protests planned for this weekend out of fear that they could trigger renewed violence.

One had been called for November 24 by an anti-fascist group in memory of Carlos Javier, who was buried in the Almudena cemetery on Tuesday. The other, planned for this Saturday, was being organized by the National Alliance (AN) in protest at Spanish immigration laws.

Nonetheless, three demonstrations linked to the 37th anniversary of Franco's death on November 20 have been allowed to proceed. They include a march by the Falange party, Franco's former political organization, from central Madrid to the tomb at the Valle de los Caídos where the former fascist dictator and Falange founder José Antonio Primo de Rivera are buried.

Under recently approved legislation, the Valle de los Caídos site is scheduled to be "depoliticized" as a memorial for all victims of the Civil War.

[Copyright EL PAÍS, SL./ J. A. HERNÁNDEZ / Oriol Güell 2007]

Subject: Spanish news

 

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