Extradition of Madrid massacre suspect delayed

5th April 2006, Comments 0 comments

5 April 2006, LONDON — A London court postponed making a decision on the extradition to Spain of a suspected Islamic radical believed to have played a role in the Madrid train bombings that killed 191 people.

5 April 2006

LONDON — A London court postponed making a decision on the extradition to Spain of a suspected Islamic radical believed to have played a role in the Madrid train bombings that killed 191 people.

The man wanted by Spain for trial is Syrian-born naturalized Spanish citizen Moutaz Almallah Dabas.

A court official told reporters the matter was put off until after Easter at the earliest.

The court had been expected to rule on Wednesday on an appeal by the terror suspect, who alleges that he faces detention without access to a lawyer and possible torture if he is turned over to Spanish authorities.

If the London court rejects his appeal, Dabas will still have the option of taking his case to the House of Lords, Britain's highest judicial authority.

Dabas filed his appeal in November, six days after Bow Street court Judge Anthony Evans authorized his extradition to Spain, saying he was "satisfied" with the arguments raised by Spanish authorities regarding Dabas, who was present in the courtroom.

Evans rejected the arguments of Dabas's attorney, Mark Summers, who said, among other things, that the suspect might be held incommunicado and was "at risk" of abuse and torture should he be turned over to Spanish authorities.

The 39-year-old Dabas was arrested in Slough, in western London, on in March, 2005, in response to a Europe-wide arrest warrant issued by Spanish National Court Judge Juan del Olmo, who is handling the case of the Madrid bombings.

Since his arrest, Dabas has been held at the maximum-security Belmarsh prison in southeast London, where terror suspects are detained.

Moutaz Abdullah Dabas is a brother of Syrian Mohannad Almallah Dabas, who was arrested in Madrid last year in connection with the 11 March, 2004, bombings that killed 191 people and wounded some 1,500 others in the Spanish capital.

According to the Spanish Interior Ministry, the Dabas brothers were in contact with some of the main suspects in the bombings of commuter trains in Madrid two years ago.

Spanish authorities also allege both were involved in recruiting radical Islamic youths in Spain for training abroad.

The investigation into the bombings has linked 116 people to the attacks, of whom 24 are in prison.

One suspect, Rabei Osman Al Sayed, is in an Italian jail - and 42 others are free on parole.

So far, only one of the participants in the attacks has been tried and found guilty.

A Spanish minor nicknamed "El Gitanillo" (The little gypsy) was sentenced to six years in prison for transporting some of the explosives used in the bombs that were placed in backpacks and left by members of a Muslim terror cell on board crowded commuter trains during morning rush hour.

The backpack-bombs were detonated remotely by means of cellphone calls.

Seven members of the terror cell blew themselves up in an apartment in Leganes, near Madrid, on 3 April, 2004, when it became clear to them that Spanish police had them cornered and were closing in on them.

One police officer also died in that blast.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

 

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