Digging into Spain's past

4th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

4 August 2004, MADRID – Archaeologists digging on the outskirts of the town of Pego in Alicante province say they have uncovered the remains of a Visigoth township that dates back to the seventh century AD.

4 August 2004

MADRID – Archaeologists digging on the outskirts of the town of Pego in Alicante province say they have uncovered the remains of a Visigoth township that dates back to the seventh century AD.

Work on the site began five months ago after a section of the settlement was discovered during the ploughing of a field.

The major find so far is a necropolis containing 15 tombs says the man in charge of the dig, Josep Gisbert, who is director of the archaeological museum in Dénia.

Between the tombs, the archaeologists have also found parts of a dowry, which includes rings, ear-rings and silver necklaces.

"This necropolis is vitally important to understanding the history of the Marina Alta district and the whole Comunidad Valencia (region)," said Gisbert.

The site of the dig, near the natural park of Marjal, "offers an important heritage unit of which we already know the necropolis, the settlement, and a whole series of elements that tie in with life in the late Romanised era," he added.

The cultural councillor for Pego, Rafael Moll, said the finds represented "a reencounter with our ancestors" who had been running a thriving settlement dedicated to agriculture and keeping livestock in the seventh century.

He said the town council is ready to give the go-ahead to further excavations, which could reveal even more tombs.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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