Checkmate at Linares as Kasparov retires

11th March 2005, Comments 0 comments

11 March 2005, LINARES- Garry Kasparov, the former world chess champion who is still considered the world's greatest player, announced he was retiring from the professional game.

11 March 2005

LINARES- Garry Kasparov, the former world chess champion who is still considered the world's greatest player, announced  he was retiring from the professional game.

The emotional grand master made the surprise announcement after winning the Linares chess tournament in Spain against Bulgaria's world number three Veselin Topalov, despite losing the final game.

"I will continue to play chess because it is a lot of fun, but no longer on a professional level. I will still play simultaneous games or blitz (lightning-fast) games but nothing else," the 41-year-old told a news conference in this city in southern Spain.

The Russian champion said he had taken the decision due to enormous pressure he had been under during the past few years and complained of a lack of support from the World Chess Federation (FIDE).

"I don't want to be pretentious or give lessons to anybody. I want to live my life," said the 'ogre of Baku', expressing his "disappointment concerning the process of reunifying the (world) title."

Kasparov announced in January he was withdrawing from the world championship due to be held this year in Turkey because frustration with FIDE had led to financial loss and psychological hardship.

In the 1990s Kasparov set up the Association of Chess Professionals (ACP) along with other international grand masters who were in disagreement with the official FIDE.

Kasparov indicated that he would now devote himself to writing and to Russian politics.

"All decent people should unite against dictatorship," he said referring to Russian President Vladimir Putin, adding that he hoped to put certain ideas into practice.

The legendary player will complete his series of books on "My Great Predecessors" on great players of the past and write a new book titled "How Life Imitates Chess."

Kasparov is considered the world's best chess player, even though he lost the title of world champion to Vladimir Kramnik in 2000.

He achieved world renown in his tussles with IBM's Deep Blue computer, which beat him in 1997, and by drawing with Deep Blue Junior and X3D Fritz in 2003.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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