Calatrava's Dallas project to unite rich and poor

10th May 2005, Comments 0 comments

10 May 2005, DALLAS — Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is to design three bridges to link figuratively as well as physically the rich and poor residents of Dallas, Texas.

10 May 2005

DALLAS — Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is to design three bridges to link  figuratively as well as physically the rich and poor residents of Dallas, Texas.

Spanish influences, from culinary to trade to the arts, have a special place in what is the sixth-largest city in the United States.

Calatrava, a renowned architect, artist and engineer, is playing a role in the physical and cultural transformation of Dallas by way of three bridges across the city's Trinity River.

Calatrava told EFE from his New York office that his mission was to "improve the living conditions of people, bring communications closer and reduce the differences between one shore and the other through this public works project, which is also a work of art".

"I want the (Dallas project) to serve as a symbol for future generations, to offer prospects for the revitalization of the city, with a substantial personality. In Dallas, the river plays a major role in development," the architect said.

Calatrava, whose output has been prolific in Europe, said that among his upcoming projects in the US were a transport project and skyscraper in New York, a building in Atlanta, Georgia, and a skyscraper in Chicago.

In Dallas, Calatrava has designed three enormous suspension bridges along the Trinity that will link the southern section of the city to the downtown area at a cost of several hundred million euros.

The three bridges, financed with a combination of public and private funds, are expected to be completed in about two-and-a-half years. The first of the three bridges should be completed around the end of this year.

Dallas officials are not hiding their excitement at having Calatrava involved in the project and they have said it is a key element in the development of the Trinity.

Ironically, before taking on the suspension-bridge project, Calatrava was best known in Dallas not for a bridge but for an enormous metallic sculpture titled 'La ola' (The Wave), which evokes the sea.

The work, located at the entrance of the Meadows Museum of Fine Arts at Southern Methodist University, is highlighted by constant movement and fluidity - like nature -, the same theme woven into some of the architect's other works.

The 53-year-old architect is also know for his artistic pursuits in support of urban renewal, and that was why Dallas officials wanted to put his talents to work on the bridges.

[Copyright EFE with Expatica]

Subject: Spanish news

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