Boyfriend used GPS to track victim’s movements

4th December 2007, Comments 0 comments

4 December 2007, ALICANTE/MADRID - The mother of Svetlana Orlova, the Russian woman allegedly murdered by her former boyfriend after refusing his marriage proposal on a live television programme, says that the ex-boyfriend used a cell phone tracking service to monitor her movements.

4 December 2007

ALICANTE/MADRID - The mother of Svetlana Orlova, the Russian woman allegedly murdered by her former boyfriend after refusing his marriage proposal on a live television programme, says that the ex-boyfriend used a cell phone tracking service to monitor her movements.

Speaking from Alicante on Saturday, Tamara Orlova said that Ricardo Navaro, who has been charged with her murder and is currently awaiting trial in prison, had activated the GPS (global positioning system) on Svetlana Orlova's phone, allowing him to locate her when he called her number.

Five days after appearing on the Antena 3 program Diario de Patricia (Patricia's Diary) - which has an audience of more than two million viewers - 30-year-old Svetlana Orlova was found dead at her home in Alicante, her throat slit.

"We are all guilty for what happened to Svetlana," said Ms Orlova.

Ms. Orlova had traveled to Alicante, where her daughter lived, to organise the repatriation of Svetlana's body to the family home in St. Petersburg. The Spanish government is to pay the cost of repatriating the body of Svetlana. Alicante City Hall and the Generalitat de Valencia will meet the remaining costs, contributing €1,000 and €3,000 respectively.

The Orlova family will also apply to the Spanish authorities for custody of their daughter's son from a previous relationship.

When Orlova agreed to appear on the show she did not know that her former boyfriend would be there to attempt reconciliation. Clearly uncomfortable at the situation she found herself in, and prodded into giving a reply, she rejected Navaro's wedding proposal, which he had made after going down on one knee.

TV researchers were unaware that Navaro had been given a two-year restraining order due to a previous case of abuse that prevented him from making any contact with Orlova.

Critics of the program say that Navaro's humiliation led him to murder Orlova. Following a nationwide outcry, the government has held talks with broadcasters, calling for greater self-regulation, and an end to a ratings war in which reality shows are accused of going to increasingly extreme lengths to win greater audience share.

There have been a number of high-profile murders of women murdered by their partners after appearing on television, the last in November 2004.

Spain has one of the highest rates of domestic violence in Western Europe, and around 70 women are killed each year by husbands and boyfriends.

[Copyright EL PAÍS, SL./ REBECA LLORENTE 2007]

Subject: Spanish news

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