US begins expulsion proceedings against Nazi collaborator

1st September 2009, Comments 0 comments

The US Justice Department said in a statement that it had begun expulsion proceedings against John Kalymon of Troy, Michigan, for "violent acts of persecution" against Jews while serving with the Nazi-sponsored Ukrainian Auxiliary Police in occupied Lviv, Ukraine.

Washington -- The United States on Monday took steps to expel a man found to have taken part in Nazi-sponsored killings and persecutions of Ukrainian Jews during World War II.

The Justice Department said in a statement that it had begun expulsion proceedings against John Kalymon, 88 -- formerly Iwan Kalymon -- of Troy, Michigan, for "violent acts of persecution" against Jews while serving with the Nazi-sponsored Ukrainian Auxiliary Police (UAP) in occupied Lviv, Ukraine.

A charging document filed last week in US Immigration Court in Detroit, Michigan said that from May 1942 to March 1944, while a member of the auxiliary police force, Kalymon "personally shot Jews ... killing at least one."

He also allegedly took part in "operations in which Jews were forcibly deported to be murdered in gas chambers and to serve as slave labourers."

Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said in a statement Monday that Kalymon's impending expulsion demonstrates Washington's resolve "to deny safe haven in this country to human rights violators, no matter how long ago they committed their heinous acts."

"The ultimate removal of John Kalymon will close a very painful chapter and provide a measure of justice to his victims and their families," he added.

During the German occupation of Lviv -- which had been part of Poland before the war -- Nazi German forces, assisted by the UAP, restricted more than 100,000 Jews to a ghetto in the city, periodically beating and shooting those who showed any sign of resistance.

Most of the Jews were later shot or sent to be killed in the Belzec extermination centre.

Kalymon immigrated to the United States in May 1949 from Germany, where he had fled in the war's closing months, concealing his Nazi past from US immigration officials.

His US citizenship, obtained in October 1955, was revoked by a federal judge in Detroit in March 2007.

"With the active assistance of collaborators like John Kalymon, the Nazis annihilated some 100,000 innocent Jewish men, women and children in Lviv," said Eli Rosenbaum, director of the Criminal Division of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations (OSI).

"Participants in such crimes have forfeited any right to enjoy the precious privilege of US citizenship or to continue residing in the United States," he said.

Since OSI began operations in 1979, it has won cases against 107 individuals who participated in Nazi-sponsored persecution.

In May, US authorities deported former Nazi death camp guard John Demjanjuk to face trial in Germany on charges of being an accessory to the murder of 27,900 people at the Sobibor death camp.

AFP/Expatica

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