Transrapid has'chance' in China

16th January 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 January 2004, BERLIN - Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder said Friday he still believes there are chances for the German magnetic levitation train Transrapid project in China despite reports to the contrary in the Beijing press. In comments aired on the first German TV network ARD morning programme, Schroeder said he believed "that the train which functions well...will have its chances" in China. But he conceded he had not been able to study the Chinese press reports that the Beijing government had decided ag

16 January 2004

BERLIN - Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder said Friday he still believes there are chances for the German magnetic levitation train Transrapid project in China despite reports to the contrary in the Beijing press.

In comments aired on the first German TV network ARD morning programme, Schroeder said he believed "that the train which functions well...will have its chances" in China.

But he conceded he had not been able to study the Chinese press reports that the Beijing government had decided against maglev technology for the 1,300-kilometre Beijing-Shanghai route.

Schroeder's remarks were recorded Thursday evening, the same day that both the Transrapid consortium and the German Transportation Ministry denied the reports.

The Jinghua Times reported that conventional, rather than the German-developed maglev technology, would be used for the Beijing- Shanghai link.

The paper said that Premier Wen Jiabao chaired a meeting on 7 January on the long-term development of the rail network and that the State Council accepted experts' suggestions that conventional technology was more suitable than maglev for the link.

The world's first commercial maglev line, a 30-kilometre link to Shanghai's main airport, formally opened to passengers last month. The USD one billion (EUR 1.25 billion)project used a system from Transrapid, which is led by Siemens and Thyssen-Krupp.

Meanwhile, a leading railway technology researcher on Friday said most Chinese experts do not favour the use of magnetic levitation technology for a planned high-speed link between Beijing and Shanghai.

"Most of the experts consider it is rational to stick to conventional railway technology (for the Beijing-Shanghai line)," Wang Derong, vice director of the China Transport Association, told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa.

A maglev line would be too expensive and hard to integrate with conventional lines, said Wang, a retired railway engineer who has researched technology for the proposed Beijing-Shanghai line for the past 10 years.

A conventional line would cost only about half as much as a maglev one, he said.

A railway ministry official was quoted late last year as saying Japanese Shinkansen technology was "90 percent certain" to be used for the Beijing-Shanghai line.

 



DPA
Subject: German news

 

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