Transatlantic divisions persist; Europeanswant EU to be superpower

10th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

10 September 2004 , WASHINGTON - Europeans want the European Union to become a superpower like the United States - but oppose more military spending - while Americans want a closer partnership with the continent, according to a survey published by the German Marshall Fund of the United States and other foundations. The "Transatlantic Trends 2004" study also found a split among Americans about whether the United States should remain the only superpower. The report, which was based on extensive polling of Eu

10 September 2004

WASHINGTON - Europeans want the European Union to become a superpower like the United States - but oppose more military spending - while Americans want a closer partnership with the continent, according to a survey published by the German Marshall Fund of the United States and other foundations.

The "Transatlantic Trends 2004" study also found a split among Americans about whether the United States should remain the only superpower.

The report, which was based on extensive polling of Europeans and Americans, was issued on the eve of the third anniversary of the 11 September 2001, terrorist attacks on the US which precipitated global unity in the fight against terrorism. That unity has dissipated as US President George Bush led the country into war in Iraq against opposition from Germany, France and Russia.

"After the intense debates and disagreements of the past three years, the transatlantic community is divided," the report concluded. Americans and Europeans "differ markedly on how best to deal" with commonly perceived threats.

Europeans are "much less willing come a superpower like the US.

- Europeans gave the United States a chilly 55 degree rating on a thermometer of 1-100 to measure their feelings toward the country. The feeling was reciprocal. Americans gave France a 51 and Germany a 61.

- 71 percent of Americans and 60 percent of Europeans agree that the US and the EU have enough common values to cooperate on international problems.

- 79 percent of Americans want the EU to have strong world leadership; but 58 percent of Europeans oppose strong US leadership, up 9 percentage points from last year.

- 73 percent of Europeans say the war in Iraq has provoked more terrorist threats worldwide; 49 percent of Americans agreed.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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