Third suspect charged over German train plot

28th August 2006, Comments 0 comments

28 August 2006, KONSTANZ/BEIRUT - An investigating judge at Germany's Federal Supreme Court (BHG) on Saturday charged a third suspect in connection with foiled bomb attacks on trains in Germany. The man detained in Konstanz, identified only as Fadi A S, stands accused of membership in a terrorist organization, several counts of attempted murder and trying to cause bomb attacks using explosive devices, the German Federal Attorney's Office said. At dawn Friday, armed police raided a student hostel in the sou

28 August 2006

KONSTANZ/BEIRUT - An investigating judge at Germany's Federal Supreme Court (BHG) on Saturday charged a third suspect in connection with foiled bomb attacks on trains in Germany.

The man detained in Konstanz, identified only as Fadi A S, stands accused of membership in a terrorist organization, several counts of attempted murder and trying to cause bomb attacks using explosive devices, the German Federal Attorney's Office said.

At dawn Friday, armed police raided a student hostel in the southern German city of Konstanz and detained Fadi A S who was described as an acquaintance of Youssef al-Hajdib, 21, the alleged bomber who was arrested in Germany a week ago.

Altogether, four men have been arrested - two each in Germany and Lebanon - in connection with the failed attempt on July 31 to blow up two trains. The suitcase bombs failed to explode and were only discovered later on by unsuspecting train guards at the left luggage offices in the Dortmund and Koblenz trains stations.

In Beirut, Lebanese Interior Minister Ahmed Fatfat told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa that investigations were focusing on what group the alleged plotters worked for. He added that something had been discovered "that (one suspect) can be related to al-Qaeda."

Fatfat said Jihad Hamad, 20 - an alleged bomber who turned himself over to police in Tripoli on Thursday - had confessed he had carried a suitcase onto a train in Germany - but did not know what was in it.

"The interrogation today is focusing on the second suspect who was arrested in Lebanon on Friday and was identified by the initials K H D, and was born in 1982 in Akkar, northern Lebanon," the sources said.

According to the sources, Hamad's information led the police to reach the second suspect.

The sources said Lebanese prosecutor Saeed Mirza met for four hours with a German delegation headed by a prosecutor during which they exchanged "delicate information regarding the investigation."

Meanwhile, a Lebanese security source said the Lebanese army intelligence has given the German government information that one of the arrested suspects who used to go by the codename of "Hamza" was a member of the Sunni funamentalist group al-Tahrir.

"Hamza's leaders who are not yet known have their bases scattered across Denmark and Sweden and recently they were recruiting people in Germany," the source said.

According to the same source one of the suspects used to smuggle Kurds across the border from Syria to Lebanon.

Al-Tahrir was given permission by the Lebanese Interior Ministry a few months ago to operate in Lebanon.

Al-Tahrir is a Sunni fundamentalist group which does not have a violent background in Lebanon, but some sources believe that some of their members outside Lebanon had established links with al-Qaeda members who are scattered across Europe.

The al-Tahrir party - "Hizb al-Tahrir" in Arabic - has set the goal of reestablishing the caliphate. The organization was founded by Sheikh Taqiuddin al-Nabhani, a judge from Jerusalem in 1953.

Hizb al-Tahrir is dedicated to what it sees as the political unity of Muslims, the removal of what it considers to be neo-colonialist Western control of Muslim lands, and a return to a state based on Islamic law (Sharia).

In accordance with that, the party has called for Muslims to overthrow their governments, establish the caliphate, and declare jihad against Israel. The party has called suicide bombings in Israel "legitimate" acts of "martyrdom."

The party is banned in many Arab countries, but permitted to operate in the more liberal UAE, Lebanon and Yemen. It is banned in Germany and Russia, and throughout the former Soviet Union states of Central Asia.

It survived a ban in Australia after clearance from the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation.

On August 5, 2005, Tony Blair announced the British government's intention to ban the group in the United Kingdom. But it is believed that he shelved the ban after warnings from police, intelligence chiefs, and civil liberties groups that it is a non-violent group, and that driving it underground could backfire.

DPA

Subject: German news

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