Snow, ice create traffic chaos in Germany

24th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

24 January 2005, HAMBURG - A winter cold front bringing snow and ice created traffic chaos and caused numerous accidents on roads and highways in parts of Germany and the Netherlands early Monday. The worst-affected areas in Germany were the northwestern states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia, the first regions to be hit as the cold front swept in from the northeast after already striking the Netherlands. Police in North Rhine-Westphalia counted 760 accidents between Sunday evening and Monday mo

24 January 2005

HAMBURG - A winter cold front bringing snow and ice created traffic chaos and caused numerous accidents on roads and highways in parts of Germany and the Netherlands early Monday.

The worst-affected areas in Germany were the northwestern states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia, the first regions to be hit as the cold front swept in from the northeast after already striking the Netherlands.

Police in North Rhine-Westphalia counted 760 accidents between Sunday evening and Monday morning. On the superhighways, there were around 70 tailbacks totalling almost 180 kilometres.

At the Dusseldorf airport, an Atlas Air cargo jumbo jet arriving from Dubai slid off the runway on landing under icy conditions. Two engines caught fire but there were no injuries in the accident which partly hampered the airport's normal operations.

In Lower Saxony, police counted more than 70 accidents, with two seriously injured motorists and damages of upwards of EUR 550,000.

On the A1 superhighway, a tractor-trailer lorry loaded with 25 tons of peas slid out of control, crashed into the middle barrier and then blocked the highway as peas spilled onto the pavement. The driver was not injured.

Snow and ice also hampered traffic in many other German states as well, creating long tailbacks on the superhighways, traffic authorities reported.

In the Netherlands, snow and icy conditions led to long tailbacks on Dutch motorways early Monday.

The authorities said there were 60 tailbacks during the morning peak, totalling around 554 kilometres in length. This was the worst total since 1999, when a 974-kilometre tailback length was recorded.

One of the worst affected roads was the A2 leading into Amsterdam, where the tailback reached 21 kilometres in length. The 37-kilometre route linking Oosterbeek and Bunnik was reported almost totally full.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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