Slovak massacre suspect proclaims innocence

16th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 September 2004 , MUNICH - Ladislav Niznansky, the former Slovakian citizen facing what may be the world's last Second World War atrocity trial, denied to a German court Thursday that he played any part in three massacres. Niznansky, 86, told the Munich judges: "Civilians were taboo as far as I was concerned." He has previously admitted being a soldier in the armed forces of the Slovak puppet state, and later joining a Nazi-led anti-insurgency force that hunted down and killed anti-German partisans in 19

 16 September 2004

MUNICH - Ladislav Niznansky, the former Slovakian citizen facing what may be the world's last Second World War atrocity trial, denied to a German court Thursday that he played any part in three massacres.

Niznansky, 86, told the Munich judges: "Civilians were taboo as far as I was concerned."

He has previously admitted being a soldier in the armed forces of the Slovak puppet state, and later joining a Nazi-led anti-insurgency force that hunted down and killed anti-German partisans in 1945.

Now a German national, he has been indicted with a role in the murder of 164 people, many of them women and children. The indictment says he personally fired the sub-machine-gun that killed at least 20 and commanded the execution squads that killed the others.

The communist authorities in Czechoslovakia sentenced him to death in absentia in 1962 and often pointed to his employment at the Radio Free Europe research department in Munich in an effort to discredit the radio station.

German prosecutors dropped an inquiry against him, maintaining they did not have free access to information, but re-opened the case in 2001, when post-communist Slovakia sent over the files. Niznansky is being held at a Munich jail.

DPA

Subject: German news

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