Second arrest in Libyan nuclear probe

16th November 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 November 2004 , KARLSRUHE - Federal investigators in Germany announced on Tuesday the arrest of a second Swiss national as part of a continuing investigation into smuggling of nuclear technology to Libya. Federal Prosecutor-General Kay Nehm said the suspect, identified only as a 61-year-old Swiss businessman, was arrested on Saturday. Last month a 39-year-old Swiss national was arrested in Germany, accused of helping Libya's nuclear programme. Prosecutors allege both men helped Libya develop and build g

16 November 2004

KARLSRUHE - Federal investigators in Germany announced on Tuesday the arrest of a second Swiss national as part of a continuing investigation into smuggling of nuclear technology to Libya.

Federal Prosecutor-General Kay Nehm said the suspect, identified only as a 61-year-old Swiss businessman, was arrested on Saturday. Last month a 39-year-old Swiss national was arrested in Germany, accused of helping Libya's nuclear programme.

Prosecutors allege both men helped Libya develop and build gas ultra-centrifuges used for the enrichment of uranium and the production of nuclear weapons.

Investigators say the suspect was part of an international illegal network supplying centrifuge technology and operating mainly out of Dubai.

A statement from prosecuting authorities in Karlsruhe said a Sri Lankan national, Buhary Seyed Abu Tabir, acted as middleman between the supply network and the country of purchase.

The accused received from Tabir the task of supervising the production of more than 2,000 centrifugal parts at a Malaysian firm and of instructing Libyan personnel in their use.

The parts were shipped to Dubai, reloaded onto a German freighter under a false declaration and sent on their way to Libya.

However, the ship was stopped at the port of Taranto in Italy in October last year and the freight was seized on the orders of German authorities.

Prosecutors said the arrests are in connection with their investigations of others, including a 65-year-old German national living in South Africa, in connection with illegal supplies to Libya.

Libya stopped its gas ultra-centrifuge programme in December 2003. In March it signed an additional protocol to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty allowing inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency to carry out snap checks on all its nuclear facilities.

DPA

Subject: German news

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