Second German terrorist seeks parole

19th February 2007, Comments 0 comments

19 February 2007, Karlsruhe, Germany (dpa) - Germany may release a second woman from the former Baader-Meinhof gang this year, with a federal prosecutor saying Saturday that the jailed terrorist will have an opportunity for parole soon. A state superior court has already begun a review of the detention of Eva Sybille Haule, 52, the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported Saturday. She is one of four members of the Red Army Faction (RAF) still in jail for murders and bombings in the 1970s. Another

19 February 2007

Karlsruhe, Germany (dpa) - Germany may release a second woman from the former Baader-Meinhof gang this year, with a federal prosecutor saying Saturday that the jailed terrorist will have an opportunity for parole soon.

A state superior court has already begun a review of the detention of Eva Sybille Haule, 52, the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported Saturday. She is one of four members of the Red Army Faction (RAF) still in jail for murders and bombings in the 1970s.

Another woman, Brigitte Mohnhaupt, 57, is to be freed next month under a court order issued in the city of Stuttgart on Monday.

A spokeswoman for the federal prosecutor in Karlsruhe confirmed that Haule's minimum period in detention expires this year, meaning that judges have the power to release her if they decide she has been well behaved and is no longer a danger to society.

The newspaper was more specific about the date, saying Haule must stay in custody a minimum of 21 years and the period was up on August 1. It added that the application was already before a court in Frankfurt.

The decision in the past week to free Mohnhaupt after 24 years behind bars has been controversial in Germany, as has an application for clemency by Christian Klar, 54, to Germany's President Horst Koehler. His minimum term does not expire till 2009.

Haule was arrested in August 1986 and convicted on three counts of murder and 23 of attempted murder.

The authorities said she helped mount a bomb attack on a NATO school in southern Germany in 1984 and helped shoot dead Ernst Zimmermann, chief executive of the MTU armaments company, in 1985.

The newspaper said she had applied last year for parole. The state superior court rejected this, but adjusted her minimum term to 21 years.

Germans are divided about the releases, with police unions and other critics saying the former terrorists should apologize and admit that the assassinations and kidnappings that plunged West Germany into a crisis lasting till the early 1980s were evil.

But legal officials have said the terrorists are entitled to the same treatment as common criminals, who do not have to admit they were wrong when they seek parole. The RAF has wound itself up but most of its surviving leaders have never apologized.

DPA

Subject: German news

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