Rwandan genocide suspect arrested in Germany

20th September 2007, Comments 0 comments

20 September 2007, Frankfurt (AFP) - A former Rwandan cabinet minister wanted for war crimes committed during the 1994 genocide in the African state has been arrested in Germany, police said on Wednesday.

20 September 2007

Frankfurt (AFP) - A former Rwandan cabinet minister wanted for war crimes committed during the 1994 genocide in the African state has been arrested in Germany, police said on Wednesday.

The former planning minister is suspected of encouraging the mass murder of members of Rwanda's Tutsi minority by arming the Hutu majority, a spokeswoman for the federal police said.

She said the 50-year-old suspect was arrested near the western city of Frankfurt on

Monday at the request of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).
ICTR spokesman Roland Amoussouga confirmed the ex-minister's identity as Augustin Ngirabatware, a former Hutu minister who is on the tribunal's list of war crimes suspects.

Rwandan Justice Minister Tharcisse Karugarama hailed the arrest and said his country would "demand that justice be done and that this genocide suspect be quickly extradited to the ICTR to answer for his acts."

German police launched a manhunt for the suspect, who has been living in various homes around Frankfurt, in July.

The state prosecution in Frankfurt told AFP that extraditing the suspect could "take a long time" as he might challenge the process.

Ngirabatware served as Rwanda's planning minister for the four years leading up to the genocide and has since then lived in Gabon and in France for long periods.

He is the son-in-law of business magnate Felicien Kabuga, who has also been named by the ICTR as a genocide suspect.

Kabuga is considered as having held the purse-strings of Rwanda's so-called hate media, which incited ethnic Hutus to "kill the Tutsi cockroaches" during the bloodletting.

The Rwandan genocide claimed some 800,000 lives in the space of a hundred days.

The ICTR, which is based in neighbouring Tanzania, was set up by the United Nations in the aftermath of the genocide to try the key suspects in the massacres.

To date, it has convicted and sentenced 28 war criminals and acquitted five suspects.

AFP

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article