Rightwing parties forge German election alliance

17th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

17 January 2005, MUNICH - Germany's two leading extreme rightwing parties have signed an alliance aimed at sending their represenatives to the national parliament. The National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) and the German Peoples Union (DVU) announced on the weekend their aim to campaign jointly in national elections set for autumn of 2006. NPD leader Udo Voigt and his DVU counterpart, publisher Gerhard Frey, signed an agreement under which the NPD will head a ticket that will include DVU candidates. V

17 January 2005

MUNICH - Germany's two leading extreme rightwing parties have signed an alliance aimed at sending their represenatives to the national parliament.

The National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) and the German Peoples Union (DVU) announced on the weekend their aim to campaign jointly in national elections set for autumn of 2006.

NPD leader Udo Voigt and his DVU counterpart, publisher Gerhard Frey, signed an agreement under which the NPD will head a ticket that will include DVU candidates.

Voigt said the alliance would show the red card to the "established national traitors" - a remark taken to be a reference to the establishment parties in Germany.

"We are going to deliver election campaigns that will take your hearing and sight away," he said.

Under the terms, while the NPD will carry the banner in the 2006 national elections, the DVU will do so for the 2009 European parliament elections. The two parties have yet to agree on how they will proceed in forthcoming German state elections.

A third rightist party, the Republicans, declined to join the alliance.

Under German parliamentary rules, a party must gain at least 5 per cent of the vote in order to gain entry to parliament. In the past, the rightist parties, squabbling among themselves, have split up the right-wing vote and so failed to clear the hurdle.

The NPD and DVU cooperated in September 2004 to gain entry into two eastern German state parliaments by agreeing not to campaign against each other.

The NPD, running a campaign rife with virulent anti-foreigner sloganeering, won 9.2 percent of the vote to gain entry into the Saxony state parliament. The DVU won 6.1 percent to do so in the state of Brandenburg.

The meeting of the NPD and DVU leaders in Munich was held under tight police security. Police kept about 40 demonstrators away from the venue.

German parliamentary officials have raised questions about the legality of the NPD-DVU alliance. They noted that German election laws forbid parties from entering short-term alliances and combining their lists of candidates.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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