Reports link Bundesliga to match-rigging affair

1st February 2005, Comments 0 comments

1 February 2005, DRESDEN - German football's top division, the Bundesliga, was on Tuesday linked for the first time by two news reports to a match-rigging affair in the country. The respected Sueddeutsche Zeitung broadsheet and mass circulation paper Bild said that a key witness, referee Robert Hoyzer, indicated to Berlin prosecutors that he had heard this from one of three men who were on Friday arrested on fraud charges in the affair. The reports said that referee Juergen Jansen awarded Kaiserslautern th

1 February 2005

DRESDEN - German football's top division, the Bundesliga, was on Tuesday linked for the first time by two news reports to a match-rigging affair in the country.

The respected Sueddeutsche Zeitung broadsheet and mass circulation paper Bild said that a key witness, referee Robert Hoyzer, indicated to Berlin prosecutors that he had heard this from one of three men who were on Friday arrested on fraud charges in the affair.

The reports said that referee Juergen Jansen awarded Kaiserslautern the first two goals in a 3-0 victory against SC Freiburg on 27 November 2004, although Kaiserslautern forward Carsten Jancker allegedly committed fouls ahead of them.

Bild said that Jansen was allegedly approached by Croatian gamblers ahead of the game to ensure the right outcome.

It was the first time that the Bundesliga has been linked to the affair.

Jansen, who was dropped as a match referee last weekend after first indications that his name had been mentioned in the scheme, on Monday provided an affidavit in which he protested his innocence.

Kicker sports magazine said in its November 29 edition that Jancker had committed no foul ahead of the first goal but that the second should have been disallowed.

Bild said that Jansen was among 13 men (nine players, three referees and one official) and four clubs (Dresden, Paderborn, Energie Cottbus, SC Chemnitz) were named by referee Robert Hoyzer in testimony to Berlin prosecutors.

Hoyzer last week admitted to having manipulated games in the German cup, second and third division and received money for it, allegedly from Croatian gamblers. He is now a key witness for the prosecution.

Two players, Dynamo Dresden goalkeeper Ignac Kresic and Paderborn captain Thijs Waterink, admitted on Monday to having received money from unknown persons.

Kresic, who is a reserve goalkeeper, said he shared with his team-mates the 15,000 euros he received for a 3-2 victory in a third division game with Preussen Muenster in June 2003.

Third division club Paderborn said that Waterink accepted 15,000 euros ahead of a 4-2 cup win over SV Hamburg last August, one of four four games Hoyzer is suspected of having manipulated.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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