Replay ordered for match in referee scandal

16th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

16 February 2005, HAMBURG - The German football federation (DFB) for the first time ever has ordered a game to be replayed because of criminal action in a major match-fixing scandal which also saw another referee suspended on the day. The DFB sports tribunal annulled the result of the second-division game between Ahlen and Wacker Burghausen played last October after match referee Robert Hoyzer admitted that he rigged the game to allow other place successful bets on them. Ahlen won the match 1-0 thanks to a

16 February 2005

HAMBURG - The German football federation (DFB) for the first time ever has ordered a game to be replayed because of criminal action in a major match-fixing scandal which also saw another referee suspended on the day.

The DFB sports tribunal annulled the result of the second-division game between Ahlen and Wacker Burghausen played last October after match referee Robert Hoyzer admitted that he rigged the game to allow other place successful bets on them.

Ahlen won the match 1-0 thanks to a controversial penalty for a handball offence, which also led to the dismissal of the Burghausen player.

Hoyzer, who is in custody in a widespread match-fixing investigation, has admitted helping to fix the outcome of the match and receiving a payment of EUR 30,000.

He has told investigators that rather than give a penalty for Ahlen he should have awarded a free-kick against the home side.

The DFB decision was based entirely on Hoyzer's testimony because the world governing body FIFA does not allow TV evidence to be looked into in match appeal cases of any kind.

"Hoyzer deliberately made a wrong call, that is the only relevant fact in the case," said Horst Hilpert, head of the DFB's controll commission.

The DFB is confronted with 11 other appeals against matches on the affair.

Last week, SV Hamburg were granted EUR 2 million in compensation plus an international match in their stadium for losing a cup match last August due to referee Hoyzer's fixing. In this case the game could not be replayed because the competition has continued.

Also on Thursday, the DFB suspended referee Dominik Marks for alleged involvement in fixing two matches in the second division and regional third division and attempting together with Hoyzer to draw a Bundesliga referee, Torsten Koop, into the scheme last month.

Koop was suspended on Monday for failing to inform the DFB of the approach by Hoyzer (and Marks) which he said he turned down. Two further match officials are under suspicion as well while Hoyzer was last week banned preemptively.

Berlin prosecutors on Tuesday ordered Hoyzer to give information on all 63 matches in which he acted as referee, assistant referee or fourth official since 1 January 2003.

According to German press reports, one of the matches was a pre- season friendly between English Premier League side Middlesbrough and Bundesliga team Hansa Rostock.

Hoyzer has so far admitted to having manipulated four games, and said he turned down one manipulation offer in late 2003, and either failed to or didn't need to fix three other games.

Hoyzer's father Peter Hoyzer has reportedly also been questioned by the authorities.

The Croatian manager of a Berlin betting cafe and two of his brothers suspected of placing the bets and paying Hoyzer are in custody as investigations continue. Others, including a number of players, are also under investigation.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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