Polish court rejects German's compensation claim

21st September 2007, Comments 0 comments

20 September 2007, Warsaw (dpa) - A Polish court rejected the claim of a German citizen for compensation for properties she left behind in Communist Poland, a court spokesman in the city of Olsztyn, northeast Poland confirmed. The Olsztyn court ruled the statute of limitations on claim of German citizen Agnes Trawny, 68, had expired. The court also ruled that Trawny would be required to pay 99,000 zloty (36,930 dollars) in legal fees. An ethnic German, the woman resettled from then Communist Poland to West

20 September 2007

Warsaw (dpa) - A Polish court rejected the claim of a German citizen for compensation for properties she left behind in Communist Poland, a court spokesman in the city of Olsztyn, northeast Poland confirmed.

The Olsztyn court ruled the statute of limitations on claim of German citizen Agnes Trawny, 68, had expired.

The court also ruled that Trawny would be required to pay 99,000 zloty (36,930 dollars) in legal fees.

An ethnic German, the woman resettled from then Communist Poland to West Germany in 1977, leaving behind considerable rural properties in Poland's north-eastern Mazurian Lakes region. Poland's State Treasury subsequently took them over.

Trawny demanded in total 2.5 million zloty (932,511 dollars) in compensation from both Poland's Treasury and the north-eastern Polish town of Jedwabno which took over two properties.

Under a 2005 Polish Supreme Court ruling, Trawny recovered part of the real estate and is reported to have subsequently sold the recovered properties for some 300,000 zloty (111,900 dollars).

She was seeking compensation before the Olsztyn court for remaining properties which Poland's State Treasury had parcelled and sold.

Her case became a political flash-point in Poland, with conservative-nationalist Prime Minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski insisting in July that courts must rule in accordance with Polish "national interests" in such cases.

The comment raised sharp criticism that politics would take precedence over the law in this and similar cases.

Poles who settled in the properties left behind by ethnic Germans who fled or were expelled from Eastern Europe after the Second World War defeat of Nazi Germany, are particularly fearful they may lose their homes to their former owners should they come forward with claims.

DPA

Subject: German news

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