Poles oppose anti-German sentiment in politics

21st August 2007, Comments 0 comments

21 August 2007, Warsaw (dpa) - A 67 percent majority of Poles object to their prime ministers use of anti-German sentiment in politics, according to a fresh opinion poll publish Tuesday in Poland.

21 August 2007

Warsaw (dpa) - A 67 percent majority of Poles object to their prime ministers use of anti-German sentiment in politics, according to a fresh opinion poll publish Tuesday in Poland.

The liberal Gazeta Wyborcza daily reported Tuesday that nearly 70 per cent of respondents deemed "unacceptable" a recent statement by Poland's right-wing Law and Justice Prime Minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski that the opposition liberal Civic Platform (PO) was "too dependent on Germans."

Twenty-four per cent of respondents to the survey by independent pollsters PBS DGA thought Kaczynski's statement was "acceptable," while 9 per cent had no opinion.

PiS politicians used the anti-German card to smear PO leader Donald Tusk in the 2005 presidential race, accusing his grandfather of fighting with German forces against Poles in the World War II.

Tipped as the favourite to win the presidency, Tusk narrowly lost the ballot to Lech Kaczynski, Prime Minister Kaczynski's identical twin brother.

Having failed to hold together a stable majority coalition government, Prime Minister Kaczynski has threatened to force an autumn election.

Apparently shifting into campaign mode, the prime minister made the "German" statement to Poland's Wprost weekly news magazine.

DPA

Subject: German news

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