Philips rejects call for ban on standby mode

31st August 2007, Comments 0 comments

31 August 2007, Berlin (dpa) - Top manufacturer Philips rejected Friday demands from environmentalists for standby mode to be outlawed on consumer- electronics devices, saying in Berlin that the feature was preferred by customers.

31 August 2007

Berlin (dpa) - Top manufacturer Philips rejected Friday demands from environmentalists for standby mode to be outlawed on consumer- electronics devices, saying in Berlin that the feature was preferred by customers.

The controversy over the low-power mode, which enables devices to stay warm and "wake up" quickly, surfaced at the IFA trade fair in Berlin, one of the top shows of home entertainment equipment.

Environmentalists say that world energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide could be dramatically reduced if televisions and players were completely switched off while not in use instead of consuming power day and night.

"Consumers want it," said Rudy Provoost, head of the Dutch-based company's consumer division, defending advances in the technology at IFA.

He said Philips had managed to reduce the power consumption of its televisions while asleep to just 1 watt compared with 9 watts a decade ago.

This reduced the power cost for each television while in standby mode to less than 1 euro (about 1 dollar) annually, he added.

Environmentalists and consumer groups charged in Berlin this week that German televisions, recorders and computers which were not actually being used were gobbling up power equivalent to the output of two nuclear power stations.

The British government's energy review last year reportedly suggested that standby facilities use 8 per cent of all domestic electricity.

dpa

Subject: German news

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