Parliament joins Russian outrage over Polish resolution

28th September 2009, Comments 0 comments

Unanimously adopted by the lower house of Poland's parliament, the resolution calls on Russia to condemn crimes committed under Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, including a 1940 massacre of Polish officers.

Moscow -- The foreign affairs committee of Russia's parliament added its voice last week to Moscow's growing outrage at a Polish parliamentary resolution that links Stalinist brutality to war crimes.

"To see 'traits of genocide' in Stalinist repression against Polish soldiers ... is sacrilege," the Duma committee wrote in a letter to Polish MPs signed by its chairman Konstantin Kossatchev and seen by AFP.

To do so is to ignore "the exploits of Soviet soldiers who saved all Poles from destruction as an 'inferior race' in Auschwitz and Majdanek," it said, referring to two notorious Nazi concentration camps.

News of the letter comes a day after the Russian foreign ministry said the Polish parliamentary resolution "deals a serious blow to efforts to develop normal neighbourly relations."

Unanimously adopted by the lower house of Poland's parliament, the resolution calls on Russia to condemn crimes committed under Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, including a 1940 massacre of Polish officers.

The loss of millions of lives in Gulag prison camps under Stalin and crimes such as the massacre of the Polish officers at Katyn forest "carry the traits and characteristics of genocide," the resolution said.

Moscow and Warsaw regularly dispute the historical interpretation of events during World War II, putting a strain on bilateral relations.

In its letter, the Duma foreign relations committee criticised the Polish resolution for putting the Soviet Union "at the same level" with Nazi Germany notably with regards to "the extermination of whole peoples."

APF/Expatica

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