Pakistan, China criticise Security Council hopefuls

22nd June 2005, Comments 0 comments

22 June 2005, NEW YORK - Pakistan and China repeat criticisms on Tuesday against countries seeking permanent seats on the U.N. Security Council, saying their campaign is unfair and is taking up too much time.

22 June 2005

NEW YORK - Pakistan and China repeat criticisms on Tuesday against countries seeking permanent seats on the U.N. Security Council, saying their campaign is unfair and is taking up too much time.

The ambassadors of Pakistan and China were addressing the first informal session of the U.N. General Assembly on reforming the 60-year-old world organization. The 191-nation assembly was discussing a draft blueprint on U.N. reform.

Under a plan presented by Germany, Japan, India and Brazil, those countries and two African nations would newly join the Security Council as permanent members without veto powers. There would be also four new members elected for two-year terms.

In some of the strongest language so far, Pakistani Ambassador Munir Akram told Tuesday's session that the four powers' plan is "inequitable and unfair" to other U.N. members.

"Some of those excluded would have as good if not better credentials to serve on the council than some of the declared aspirants," Akhram said.

Chinese Ambassador Wang Guanya said the gulf between those opposing and those seeking permanent seats remains "significant."

"Recent debates surrounding the enlargement of the Security Council has already affected and impaired discussions on other major issues," said Wang, whose government strongly opposes Japan because of atrocities committed by Japanese troops when they occupied China during World War II.

Pakistan and China belong to a group that is battling the four- power plan as the U.N. struggles to overhaul the organization.

Assembly President Jean Ping, the foreign minister of Gabon, called for the two-day session to begin the reform debate. He presented to the membership the "draft outcome resolution" which includes the principles for changing the way the U.N. has been doing business in the past 60 years, but not all the details.

The document deals with programmes on development, financing, HIV/AIDS and other health issues, gender equality, science and technology, peace and collective security, peacekeeping and peacebuilding, use of force, terrorism and human rights and rule of law.

The document calls for making the U.N. Security Council more representative and transparent, but make no specific proposal on reorganization.

World leaders are scheduled to discuss U.N. reform at the annual General Assembly starting September 13.

The assembly also will be called upon to change parts of the U.N. Charter, signed on June 26, 1945 in San Francisco by the 51 founding countries. The charter still considers Germany and Japan as "enemy states" because they were fought the victorious World War II Allies who established the United Nations at the war's end.

Copyright DPA with Expatica

Subject: German news

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