New help for Holocaust descendants with assets

28th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

28 June 2007, Tel Aviv (dpa) - More than 60 years after World War II, a newly etablished Israeli government company began last week for the first time ever to help descendants of Jews killed in the Holocaust track down lost property in what is now Israel. More than 30,000 Israelis called the hotline of The Company for Tracking Down and Retrieving Assets of Holocaust Victims on its first day of operations Wednesday, Israel's Channel 10 television reported. The company has also opened a website with lists of

28 June 2007

Tel Aviv (dpa) - More than 60 years after World War II, a newly etablished Israeli government company began last week for the first time ever to help descendants of Jews killed in the Holocaust track down lost property in what is now Israel.

More than 30,000 Israelis called the hotline of The Company for Tracking Down and Retrieving Assets of Holocaust Victims on its first day of operations Wednesday, Israel's Channel 10 television reported.

The company has also opened a website with lists of assets that have been registered under the names of people killed in the Holocaust, whose children or grandchildren are being encouraged to claim them.

According to Channel 10, hundreds of millions of US dollars worth of buildings, land and savings belonging to Holocaust victims, purchased and deposited during the war or before in what at the time was British Mandatory Palestine, have never found their way to rightful heirs.

Thus far, the Israeli government had failed to actively search for the owners of lost property within its own territory, it said, despite its involvement in property claims in Germany and Switzerland.

Yishai Amrami, the chief executive of the new company, told Channel 10 that assets which were not claimed after an extensive period of time would be used to help Holocaust survivors in need.

Israel's previously state-owned Bank Leumi, privatized in late 2005, announced last week that it appointed a retired judge to examine all claims expected to be made against it.

It said that as an initial good-will gesture, it was donating several million dollars to care for Holocaust survivors in Israel.

DPA

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article