Monument unveiled to priests killed in Nazi camps

6th November 2006, Comments 0 comments

6 November 2006, Berlin (dpa) - Catholic priests and monks, the bulk of them Polish, who were killed by the Nazis in a concentration camp near Berlin were commemorated Saturday with the unveiling of a stone sculpture in the presence of Cardinal Jozef Glemp of Poland.

6 November 2006

Berlin (dpa) - Catholic priests and monks, the bulk of them Polish, who were killed by the Nazis in a concentration camp near Berlin were commemorated Saturday with the unveiling of a stone sculpture in the presence of Cardinal Jozef Glemp of Poland.

The sculpture is engraved with the names of 96 clergy who died at Sachsenhausen concentration camp on the north-west outskirts of Berlin.

Historians working for the Catholic archdiocese of Berlin have so far documented the names of 711 Catholic clergy from Poland, Germany and other European nations who were incarcerated in the camp, where inmates often died of starvation or disease or were executed.

Hundreds were later transferred to Dachau concentration camp on the outskirts of Munich and other Nazi sites, where they died.

Unveiling the monument, in which a cross has been etched in the stone, Berlin's archbishop, Cardinal Georg Sterzinsky, said the German Catholic Church was grateful that there was now a memorial to this group of Nazi victims, more than 600 of whom were Poles.

One of the surviving inmates, Kazimierz Majdanski, now 90, later went on to become Catholic bishop of Szczecin-Kamien, the Berlin archdiocese said. Glemp, who holds the title of primate of Poland, represented the Polish Catholic Church at the ceremony.

Sterzinsky appealed for continued vigilance against right-wing extremism and racism.

The Nazis opened the Sachsenhausen detention camp in 1936. Thousands more died when the Nazis forced inmates to march away as defeat loomed, but the Red Army was able to liberate 3,000 prisoners at the camp on April 22, 1945.

DPA

Subject: German news

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