Match-fixers had access to confidential UEFA lists

24th March 2005, Comments 0 comments

24 March 2005, FRANKFURT - Confidential UEFA lists with match officials for upcoming European Cup matches were made available to a betting ring accused of organised fraud in a match-fixing affair in Germany, Der Spiegel news magazine reported.

24 March 2005

FRANKFURT - Confidential UEFA lists with match officials for upcoming European Cup matches were made available to a betting ring accused of organised fraud in a match-fixing affair in Germany, Der Spiegel news magazine reported.

Der Spiegel said in a report made available ahead of Saturday's publication that German referee Robert Hoyzer testified to Berlin prosecutors that he saw such a list last autumn in the company car of a Berlin cafe in which the betters allegedly met.

Berlin prosecutors on Thursday refused to comment on the report.

Under UEFA rules, referees are not informed until 48 hours before the kickoff which match they will officiate. Only a dozen people within UEFA know the names before. The rule was introduced three years ago to prevent corruption.

Der Spiegel said that the list with referees, linesmen, UEFA observers and referee observers was made available to the men one week ahead of games.

"Asked by the surprised Hoyzer how his acquaintences obtained the internal information one week ahead of the matches, they referred to good sources," Der Spiegel said.

Berlin prosecutors are investigating against 25 people in connection with the affair in which matches were fixed to allow successful bets on them. Four men, referee Dominik Marks and three Croatian brothers charged with having placed the bets, are in detention.

UEFA is looking into possible manipulation at one UEFA Cup game from last December between Panionios Athens and Dynamo Tblisi, with the result of the investigation expected in April.

The case broke in January when three match officials reported Hoyzer to the German football federation (DFB). Hoyzer has admitted to manipulation of several games and apart from being one of the defendants is a key witness for the prosecution.

Hoyzer is currently suspended and faces a life-time refereeing ban from the DFB.

One of the three match officials who reported Hoyzer to the DFB, linesman Felix Zwayer, is under investigation himself over the issue, the DFB said on Wednesday night.

"I am not sure if Zwayer didn't get some money as well," said the DFB control commission head Horst Hilpert, whose body is investigating against Zwayer.

Zwayer dismissed the allegations which are connected to a second division game between Karlsruhe and Duisburg last December which, according to testimony from Hoyzer, was allegedly manipulated by another referee, Dominik Marks.

Zwayer was a linesman in that match and, according to prosecution documents, the target of an attempt by Marks to win him over to the manipulation scheme as well.

DPA

Subject: German news

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