Lawyer sues Germany on behalf of dead brown bear

3rd November 2006, Comments 0 comments

3 November 2006, Munich (dpa) - A lawyer has sued a German state on behalf of a dead bear, a spokesman for a tribunal in Munich said Friday, four months after Bruno the badly behaved bruin was shot. The lawyer argues it was illegal to declare open season on Bruno, an Italian-born animal that was the first wild bear to roam Bavaria state for 170 years. Officials said it was likely to attack people. Animal lovers in Germany and Italy were infuriated when hunters shot the brown bear in the woods on June 26. B

3 November 2006

Munich (dpa) - A lawyer has sued a German state on behalf of a dead bear, a spokesman for a tribunal in Munich said Friday, four months after Bruno the badly behaved bruin was shot.

The lawyer argues it was illegal to declare open season on Bruno, an Italian-born animal that was the first wild bear to roam Bavaria state for 170 years. Officials said it was likely to attack people.

Animal lovers in Germany and Italy were infuriated when hunters shot the brown bear in the woods on June 26. Bruno fans keep putting wooden crosses at the site as fast as they are removed. But prosecutors say the hunters and authorities committed no crime.

The lawyer, acting in his own name, is trying a different tack, suing at a tribunal that reviews administrative decisions and citing his constitutional right to enjoy the fruits of nature. The case could take several months to decide, the spokesman said in Munich.

German authorities say that any shy bear which stays in the woods would be welcome in Germany, but Bruno, which roamed villages and mauled sheep night after night last spring, did not score well.

An all-white roe deer that inhabits woodland in eastern Germany meanwhile won a reprieve after an outcry from animal lovers.

After colour photos of the albino appeared nationwide in German newspapers, Ralf Georgi, 56, who has hunting rights in the area near Dresden, said on RTL television he would leave the animal be, and sue if anyone poached it.

Nature authorities who were reported suggesting the rare deer be shot to stop its genes spreading insisted they had been misquoted.

DPA

Subject: German news

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