Lab test confirms geese were not bird flu victims

26th October 2005, Comments 0 comments

26 October 2005, KOBLENZ, GERMANY - The 24-hour bird-flu scare in Germany this week that followed the discovery of 22 dead geese floating in a pond was laid to rest Wednesday with a laboratory report. Stefan Bent, head of the state of Rhineland Palatinate's animal health laboratory, said rat poison was found in the stomachs of the birds. None of them had been infected with Type A influenza, the disease which has swept Asia and moved as far west as Croatia. He said an initial finding on Tuesday that two of

26 October 2005

KOBLENZ, GERMANY - The 24-hour bird-flu scare in Germany this week that followed the discovery of 22 dead geese floating in a pond was laid to rest Wednesday with a laboratory report.

Stefan Bent, head of the state of Rhineland Palatinate's animal health laboratory, said rat poison was found in the stomachs of the birds. None of them had been infected with Type A influenza, the disease which has swept Asia and moved as far west as Croatia.

He said an initial finding on Tuesday that two of the geese had had influenza did not stand up to more thorough testing.

When the dead geese were found Monday evening on a pond 100 kilometres west of Frankfurt, firemen donned biological protection suits to fish the cadavers out of the flooded gravel pit for fear they carried the deadly H5N1 strain of avian influenza.

Bent announced the rat-poison discovery Tuesday evening, but said testing would continue to establish if there were any signs of bird flu.

The only poultry infection with H5N1 in western Europe so far has been at a British quarantine station. So far 62 people in Asia have caught the illness from birds and died. Avian influenza cannot be transmitted from person to person.

DPA

Subject: German news

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