Jewish treasures unearthed near Auschwitz

22nd June 2004, Comments 0 comments

22 June 2004 , WARSAW - Invaluable Jewish religious artefacts have been unearthed near the former Auschwitz death camp where more than a million European Jews were killed by Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. Ceremonial Jewish candle holders known as menoras and Chanukah candle holders were among other religious artefacts found during an excavation of the foundations of a synagogue in the southern Polish town of Oswiecim, the location of the former Auschwitz camp. The lost treasures were discovered on the

22 June 2004

WARSAW - Invaluable Jewish religious artefacts have been unearthed near the former Auschwitz death camp where more than a million European Jews were killed by Nazi Germany during the Holocaust.

Ceremonial Jewish candle holders known as menoras and Chanukah candle holders were among other religious artefacts found during an excavation of the foundations of a synagogue in the southern Polish town of Oswiecim, the location of the former Auschwitz camp.

The lost treasures were discovered on the site of what was once Oswiecim's "Great Synagogue", burned to the ground in 1939 by Nazi forces invading Poland.

"There are very many items," historian Jacek Proszyk told the PAP, describing them as "gorgeous".

Hoping to find a lost Torah and other religious artefacts, Polish archaeologists under the direction of Malgorzata Grupa began excavations on the site earlier this month.

Grupa was hopeful that information provided by an eyewitness would help locate the lost Torah, believed to have been buried along with other religious items in wooden crates in September 1939.

Former Oswiecim resident Yariv Nornberg came up with the idea to look for the lost religious treasures after having learned about their existence from a witness who had seen them being hidden.

The project is being funded by private donors and the Claims Conference.

The first Jews settled in Oswiecim in the middle of the 15th Century. The community flourished until the World War II, with some 8,000 of the towns 12,000 residents being Jewish.

After the 1939 Nazi invasion, the town became the site of the largest death camp built in Europe by the German Third Reich. Upwards of 1.1 million people were killed there. Some 90 percent were European Jews.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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