Italy calls German UN reform plans 'divisive'

10th May 2005, Comments 0 comments

10 May 2005, ROME - Italy on Tuesday dismissed German plans to expand the United Nations Security Council as "divisive" and rejected claims that it aims to stall any form of reform.

10 May 2005

ROME - Italy on Tuesday dismissed German plans to expand the United Nations Security Council as "divisive" and rejected claims that it aims to stall any form of reform.

Addressing journalists in Rome, Italian Foreign Minister Gianfranco Fini also said 'United for Consensus', a grouping it leads along with Pakistan and which opposes the expansion of permanent Security Council members, was gaining growing attention from the international community.

"Italy has always been against (Germany's) Model A reform because it believes that it is not wise to increase the number of permanent seats, regardless of who gets them, as this will produce winners and losers. It will create divisions rather than unite," Fini said.

"Italy does not contest the right by other countries, including Germany, to join the Security Council. What Italy contests is the principle of the reform," Fini said.

The foreign minister said he believed the Model A reform, whereby Germany, Japan, India, Brazil and two African countries would become permanent members, would spark tension with other countries such as China, Pakistan and Mexico. He also said Italy would work to prevent such a model from achieving the necessary two-thirds majority in the General Assembly.

Fini's comments followed recent remarks from his German counterpart, Joschka Fischer, who had criticised countries that do not seek permanent Security Council seats but that "do not want others to attain that goal".

The remarks appeared to be directed at Italy, which would prefer the European Union as a whole, rather than a single EU members like Germany, to be given a seat.

The two opposite camps, the so-called G4 and 'United For Consensus', or 'Coffee Club', which is led by Italy and Pakistan, have made little progress during meetings aimed at ironing out their differences.

However, Fini said interest around its initiative was growing.

"We want to make a reform, not stall it," Fini said.

DPA

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article