Iraqi admits knowing of plot against premier

19th September 2006, Comments 0 comments

19 September 2006, STUUTGART - An Iraqi accused of planning to kill former Iraqi premier Iyad Allawi admitted Tuesday he was aware of a plot but did not think it would be an attempt on his life. Mazen H told the high court in Stuttgart that he had tried to talk an unnamed fellow Iraqi out of carrying out an attack on Allawi because he was against the use of violence. Mazen H, 24, is on trial together with Ata R, 32, and Rafik Y, 31, accused of plotting to assassinate the then-Iraqi leader during a visit to

19 September 2006

STUUTGART - An Iraqi accused of planning to kill former Iraqi premier Iyad Allawi admitted Tuesday he was aware of a plot but did not think it would be an attempt on his life.

Mazen H told the high court in Stuttgart that he had tried to talk an unnamed fellow Iraqi out of carrying out an attack on Allawi because he was against the use of violence.

Mazen H, 24, is on trial together with Ata R, 32, and Rafik Y, 31, accused of plotting to assassinate the then-Iraqi leader during a visit to the German capital Berlin in December 2004.

The three were arrested beforehand after police tapped their phones.

Security was tightened and Allawi, whose party polled poorly in elections last year and was not reappointed, visited Germany without incident for talks that won some new aid for Baghdad.

Mazen H told the court that the person he spoke to on the phone apparently wanted to "teach Allawi a lesson."

The 24-year-old also admitted giving money to a fellow-accused, who transferred it to Iraq so it could be used to assist victims of the fighting in the country.

The trio also face charges of raising funds or recruiting for the Iraqi terrorist organization Ansar al-Islam.

At the start of the trial in June, prosecutors said Ata R was Ansar's leader in Germany. Full names were not provided under German news guidelines protecting privacy.

Germany changed its law after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States to make it a crime punishable by up to 10 years in jail for persons on German soil to belong to a foreign terror group.

Ansar al-Islam was reportedly founded in 2001 in northern Iraq and opposes both the secular Kurdish authorities and US occupation. Prosecutors say it has a fund-raising and recruitment network in western Europe.

DPA

Subject: German news

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