Iran's nuclear negotiator rejects UN resolution

7th August 2006, Comments 0 comments

7 August 2006, TEHRAN - Iran's top nuclear negotiator Ali Larijani rejected Sunday the resolution by the United Nations Security Council ordering Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment efforts by August 31. "The resolution has no legal basis and Iran would neither approve a resolution which would deprive us from our legitimate rights according to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, nor give in to any threats and ultimatums," Larijani said in a press conference in Tehran. "The resolution even undermines t

7 August 2006

TEHRAN - Iran's top nuclear negotiator Ali Larijani rejected Sunday the resolution by the United Nations Security Council ordering Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment efforts by August 31.

"The resolution has no legal basis and Iran would neither approve a resolution which would deprive us from our legitimate rights according to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, nor give in to any threats and ultimatums," Larijani said in a press conference in Tehran.

"The resolution even undermines the role of an internationally important technical body like the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This does definitely not help the course of a diplomatic settlement of the issue," added Larijani, who is also secretary of the National Security Council.

Larijani added that the resolution would have "no impact on Iran's will to pursue and "even expand its nuclear programmes," but refrained from answering a question on whether Iran would use its oil exports as a weapon in case of UN Security Council sanctions.

"But we accept IAEA supervision and would still be willing to hold negotiations and are hopeful to reach a settlement, but such negotiations should be fair and rational as we cannot do what the West would like us to do and define our national interests accordingly," he said.

Referring to the Western nuclear package, which aimed at persuading Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment activities in return for political and economic incentives, Larijani said that Iran needed time to thoroughly evaluate all dimensions of the proposal before giving the answer on August 22.

"The proposal included long-term political, security and energy cooperation which naturally needed sufficient time to be evaluated for drawing a correct framework," he said.

Asked whether Iran would still reply to the Western proposal as scheduled on August 22, Larijani said that before replying, the West should first clarify why it adopted "double-standards" towards Tehran.

"I held lengthy talks with (EU foreign policy chief Javier) Solana and discussed all different angles for reaching a broad-based settlement of the issue and not just wasting each other's time," he said while terming the referral to the UN Security Council as derailing the negotiation course.

Larijani said that the sole demand by the West for suspending the enrichment process "needed no negotiations" as the main aim would be depriving Iran of its rights and national interests.

"We would accept any rational proposals, be ready for negotiations to remove all ambiguities, but if suspension in return for a piece of chocolate (incentives) is the main topic, then why should we sit down for negotiations?" he asked.

"The West can tell us not to move towards military use of nuclear programmes, but they cannot tell us not to pursue nuclear technology for the future energy needs of our country," Larijani added.

Larijani termed the reported proposal by former German foreign minister Joschka Fischer of the West dropping the involvement of the UN Security Council in return for Iran accepting the enrichment suspension as "naive."

"We are not little children, such proposals are like facing a complicated formula and trying to solve it through deleting," said Larijani who rejected - "due to other engagements" - a meeting with Fischer last Wednesday during the German's two-day visit to Tehran.

DPA

Subject: German news

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