Iranian satellite TV channel launched in Germany

28th September 2004, Comments 0 comments

28 September 2004 , HERMESKEIL - Broadcast operations started in Germany Tuesday for what is billed as the first-ever commercial Iranian satellite television network outside Iran. Mohajer TV, operating out of modest one-room studios in a small town near the Belgian border, features documentaries, cultural reports, films and Iranian music. The satellite network is the brainchild of expatriate Iranian Morteza Azzizadeh, who has set up the studios in a small white house near the train station in Hermeskeil, a

28 September 2004

HERMESKEIL - Broadcast operations started in Germany Tuesday for what is billed as the first-ever commercial Iranian satellite television network outside Iran.

Mohajer TV, operating out of modest one-room studios in a small town near the Belgian border, features documentaries, cultural reports, films and Iranian music.

The satellite network is the brainchild of expatriate Iranian Morteza Azzizadeh, who has set up the studios in a small white house near the train station in Hermeskeil, a town of just 6,000.

He hopes Mohajer - Farsi for "Migratory Bird" - will reach millions of ethnic Iranians living in Europe.

"We are pro-Western and will steadfastly avoid all religious and ideological content," 46-year-old Azzizadeh said.

It was under those conditions that broadcast authorities in Germany issued a permit for him to begin operation.

"It is indeed rare that foreigners receive broadcast licences in Germany," said Annette Schriefers of the DLM German broadcast authority.

For Azzizadeh, who has lived in Germany for 17 years with his wife and two children, the TV station is fulfilment of a dream. A trained electrician who operates a home appliance shop in Hermeskeil, he says nothing is being left to chance.

"In recognition of the fears of indoctrination, we will provide samples of programming to authorities for translation so that they see everything is above-board and non-propagandistic," he said.

"We want to make the network attractive to advertisers who cater to the more than 100,000 Iranians who live in Germany, not to mention the millions more who live elsewhere within range of the Eutelsat satellite," said Azzizadeh.

He is not ruling out the possibility that his modest station, with an initial staff of just 10, could also draw a following in Iran, despite legal bans in that country on satellite dish ownership.

"Iranians just love television," he said, "and millions of them have satellite dishes."

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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