Iran unsure about EU-3 as negotiation partners

25th August 2005, Comments 0 comments

25 August 2005, TEHERAN - Iran sees no justification in continuing nuclear negotiations exclusively with the European Union trio, said Iran's newly appointed chief nuclear negotiator Ali Larijani on Thursday.

25 August 2005

TEHERAN - Iran sees no justification in continuing nuclear negotiations exclusively with the European Union trio, said Iran's newly appointed chief nuclear negotiator Ali Larijani on Thursday.

Speaking on state television, Larijani said there were serious doubts whether Britain, France and Germany were the only suitable negotiation partners and whether they genuinely represent the E.U. and the board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Larijani, who is also Iran's new secretary of the National Security Council, said there could be other countries within Europe or even non-European countries within the IAEA board of governors with whom Iran could continue nuclear talks.

Earlier this week the E.U. trio cancelled its scheduled nuclear meeting on August 31 with Iran, saying they would rather wait for the September 3 IAEA report on Iran's nuclear programmes in the uranium conversion plant in Isfahan in central Iran.

Larijani regretted that the E.U. trio cancelled the scheduled meeting with Iran, saying the trio failed once again to have a "logical approach" towards building mutual confidence.

With Iran rejecting E.U. calls to stop its conversion programme, observers have considered further talks futile especially as the ultraconservative Larijani is widely seen as less compromising on the nuclear issue than his more moderate predecessor Hassan Rowhani.

Larijani reiterated that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has a new initiative for the nuclear talks which will be disclosed as soon as the new cabinet starts work.

Ahmadinejad stressed on Wednesday that he would "seriously defend" the rights of the Iranian nation on the basis of internationally acknowledged regulations.

Iran maintains that as signatory of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the additional protocol of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Iran has a legitimate right to pursue nuclear technology.

Ahmadinejad last week slammed the E.U. trio for allegedly ignoring Iran's rights and trying to condemn the Islamic state in international organizations.

According to the November 2004 Paris agreement, Iran volunteered to suspend uranium conversion and enrichment if negotiations were fruitful. Tehran no longer considers the negotiations constructive.

In Isfahan, uranium ore is converted into hexafluoride gas and stored in the plant. The gas would however be useless if not fed into centrifuges for the enrichment process in the neighbouring Natanz plant.

Low-grade enriched uranium is used for nuclear fuel, which Tehran says is the final aim of its nuclear intentions.

The same process, at a higher grade, could also be used to produce an atomic bomb, a prospect the E.U. and the United States are trying to prevent.

DPA

Subject: German news

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