Iran sets deadline for nucleartalks with Europe's big three

8th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

8 February 2005, TEHERAN - Iran's chief nuclear negotiator has set a deadline of 15 March for talks with the European Union's big three - Germany, France and Britain - on Teheran's controversial nuclear programme. "The 15 March will be the deadline for the talks with the Europeans and if no tangible results come out of them, we will not feel obliged to hold further discussions," Hassan Rowhani said in an interview with state television. Rowhani, also secretary of the National Security Council, said that th

8 February 2005

TEHERAN - Iran's chief nuclear negotiator has set a deadline of 15 March for talks with the European Union's big three - Germany, France and Britain - on Teheran's controversial nuclear programme.

"The 15 March will be the deadline for the talks with the Europeans and if no tangible results come out of them, we will not feel obliged to hold further discussions," Hassan Rowhani said in an interview with state television.

Rowhani, also secretary of the National Security Council, said that the two talks of the three nuclear, economic and political commissions have so far been "below our expectations".

"We have three more rounds of talks this week and by Friday (11 February)  we might have a more clear picture," the cleric said.

"We are prepared for the best but also the worst case," Rowhani added without further elaborating.

The chief nuclear negotiator reiterated that Iran's commitments on uranium enrichment suspension "would only be for months, not even a year", adding that the Europeans were quite aware of Iran's position.

Rowhani further said that even during the suspension, Iran has been active in its nuclear activities and completed parts of its nuclear sites without violating its commitment on suspension.

European Union members France, Germany and Britain have been attempting to mediate a deal which would see Iran opening up its nuclear programme to inspection in return for economic and political incentives.

The United States has long accused Iran of seeking to develop nuclear weapons technology. The issue has been at the centre of months of delicate negotiations between Teheran and the United Nations nuclear watchdog body - the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Washington wants the matter to go before the UN Security Council, which unlike the IAEA has the power to impose sanctions.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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