Iran says it will remove nuclear security cameras

1st February 2006, Comments 0 comments

1 February 2006, TEHRAN — Iran on Wednesday warned it would remove International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) cameras from its sites if the Iranian case was referred to the United Nations Security Council.

1 February 2006

TEHRAN — Iran on Wednesday warned it would remove International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) cameras from its sites if the Iranian case was referred to the United Nations Security Council.

"One of the practical moves by Iran could be removal of IAEA cameras from our sites," the country's chief nuclear negotiator, Ali Larijani, told a press conference in Tehran, referring to the IAEA cameras installed in the major nuclear sites of the Islamic state.

Larijani however said that Iran would maintain committed to the Non-Proliferation Treaty but not to the IAEA Additional Protocol.

He added that there will be no way to stop Iran's nuclear programme with ultimatums.

"Referring to threats, pressure and ultimatums will not stop Iran's nuclear programme and such moves are definitely not the right address and cannot make Iran give up its right," Larijani said.

Larijani once again warned with suspending all cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency if the Iran case was "reported or referred" to the UN Security Council.

He once again reiterated that all Iran wanted was pursuing its rights within the Non-Proliferation Treaty, "nothing more, nothing less," and that the country would never misuse its nuclear programmes for military purposes.

Larijani also blamed both the IAEA and the Europeans for having failed to find a settlement for the dispute and now wanted to adopt harsh measures.

He confirmed that Russian and Chinese deputy foreign ministers had come to Iran for talks over the latest developments but warned that in case of a UN referral, "Iran would also suspend evaluation of the Russian plan."

The IAEA is due to meet Thursday in Vienna to decide on the next moves in the controversy.

Earlier Wednesday, a statement by the Foreign Ministry had told the EU that the option of negotiations over Iran's nuclear programme was still open, and warned against politicizing the issue.

The statement carried by IRNA said that the path for negotiations was still open to gain a "reasonable settlement" and build confidence in the nuclear dispute.

The statement came in reply to the decision from Monday night by the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, along with the European Union and Germany, agreeing to refer the Iranian nuclear issue to the UN Security Council

In a speech in souther Iran on Wednesday, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad insisted on the country's right to pursue nuclear technology.

"Pursuing nuclear technology is the right of the Iranian nation which no other country with whatever political ballyhoo cannot prevent and we will decisively resist until realization of our right," Ahmadinejad said.

DPA

Subject: German news

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