India 'deserves' UN seat, says Gunter Grass

26th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

26 January 2005, NEW DELHI - German Nobel laureate Gunter Grass said India was stronger than ever before and "deserved" a permanent seat in the United Nations Security Council. Grass, world famous for his first allegorical novel "The Tin Drum" published in 1959, is visiting the eastern Indian city of Calcutta after 18 years, but said it took him only 30 minutes to find his "Calcutta step" again. The Nobel laureate lived in Calcutta for six months in 1986-87 and was quoted as saying in the Telegraph newspap

26 January 2005

NEW DELHI - German Nobel laureate Gunter Grass said India was stronger than ever before and "deserved" a permanent seat in the United Nations Security Council.

Grass, world famous for his first allegorical novel "The Tin Drum" published in 1959, is visiting the eastern Indian city of Calcutta after 18 years, but said it took him only 30 minutes to find his "Calcutta step" again.

The Nobel laureate lived in Calcutta for six months in 1986-87 and was quoted as saying in the Telegraph newspaper that this trip was "a little bit like coming home".

"To walk in Calcutta can be a little difficult, but in half an hour, I had found my Calcutta step," said Grass, ahead of a series of cultural events organised by the Max Mueller Bhavan and the Telegraph.

Grass may have found his feet, but he also noticed that something was not quite right. "There was something missing somewhere. I was definitely missing something. Then I realised it was the cows! The cows weren't on the streets any more," he said, adding that Calcutta's stray cows sitting in the middle of the road would earlier serve as a "traffic regulation" because no one ever moved them.

"The city has broadened by horizons. Even when I am not here, my mind keeps racing back," the 77-year-old writer said of Calcutta.

Grass was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.

DPA

Subject: German news

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