Icelandic thriller wins Karlovy Vary prize

9th July 2007, Comments 0 comments

9 July 2007, Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic (dpa) - A dark Icelandic thriller, Jar City, from director Baltasar Kormakur on Saturday won the top prize at the 42nd Karlovy Vary Film Festival. Presided over by Peter Bart, editor-in-chief of the United States entertainment magazine Variety, the festival's seven-member grand jury selected the movie for the festival's Crystal Globe from a total of 14 films, which formed the fest's main competition. Based on an award-winning crime novel, Jar City is a story about

9 July 2007

Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic (dpa) - A dark Icelandic thriller, Jar City, from director Baltasar Kormakur on Saturday won the top prize at the 42nd Karlovy Vary Film Festival.

Presided over by Peter Bart, editor-in-chief of the United States entertainment magazine Variety, the festival's seven-member grand jury selected the movie for the festival's Crystal Globe from a total of 14 films, which formed the fest's main competition.

Based on an award-winning crime novel, Jar City is a story about a troubled detective's investigation into the death of a 4-year-old girl 30 years ago and has been a box office hit in Iceland.

Australian director Michael James Rowland won a special jury prize for his film Lucky Miles, which tells the story of a group of illegal immigrants who hope for a new life in Australia after landing on the country's vast western coastline.

The festival's best director award went to Norwegian Bard Breien for his movie The Art of Negative Thinking.

Breien's film is a psychological drama about a man struggling to get his life back into order after a car accident that has left him in a wheelchair.

Indeed, movies about people suddenly finding their lives gripped by a sense of upheaval and change emerged as a major theme of the films shown at this year's festival in Karlovy Vary.

Held in the Czech Republic's historic spa town near the German border, Karlovy Vary is also one of the world's oldest film festivals with this year's programme having included nine world premieres.

During the festival's closing ceremony Saturday, the Hollywood actor Danny De Vito was presented with a Crystal Globe award for his contribution to world cinema.

The jury also gave Elvira Mínguez the best actress award for her role in the film Pudor by Spanish directors David and Tristan Ulloa which told the story of a family edging towards a crisis.

The best actor award went to Sergey Puskepalis for his role in the Russian director Alexei Popogrebsky's film Simple Things about modern everyday life in urban Russia as told by a badly paid anaesthetist.

Simple Things, which has been widely acclaimed in Russia, also won Karlovy Vary's international film critics' award and the ecumenical jury award.

Karlovy Vary has emerged in recent years as a major showcase for movies from Central and Eastern Europe with the festival including a special east-of-the-west section in its programme.

This year's east-of-the-west award went to Croatian-born director Ognjen Svilicic for his film Armin about a father's hope of securing a better future for his family through his 14-year-old son winning a role in an international film.

The east-of-the-west jury also gave a special mention to The Class from Estonian director Ilmar Raag. The Class, about the adolescent culture of classrooms, also won the Europa cinemas label award.

DPA

Subject: German news

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