Holocaust education centre opens at Auschwitz

27th May 2005, Comments 0 comments

27 May 2005, WARSAW/OSWIECIM - The International Centre for Education about Auschwitz and the Holocaust was formally called into being on Friday by Poland's minister of culture. The newly constituted institution will work within the framework of the Auschwitz State Museum in Oswiecim, southern Poland, on the site of the notorious World War Two Nazi German death camp. More than 150 former prisoners of the World War Two Auschwitz death camp have signed a document founding the Centre. The initiative was spear

27 May 2005

WARSAW/OSWIECIM - The International Centre for Education about Auschwitz and the Holocaust was formally called into being on Friday by Poland's minister of culture.

The newly constituted institution will work within the framework of the Auschwitz State Museum in Oswiecim, southern Poland, on the site of the notorious World War Two Nazi German death camp.

More than 150 former prisoners of the World War Two Auschwitz death camp have signed a document founding the Centre.

The initiative was spearheaded by Auschwitz survivors Wladyslaw Bartoszewski, Poland's former foreign minister, and French politician Simone Veil on 27 January at the site of the former death camp in Oswiecim, southern Poland, during state ceremonies marking the 60th anniversary of the camp's liberation.

Fellow Auschwitz survivor and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Eli Wiesel was the most recent to endorse the project while attending annual March of the Living between the former Auschwitz-Birkenau twin death camps earlier this month.

Other signatories include Auschwitz survivors from Israel, the United States, Ukraine, Belarus and Poland.

All urged historians and educators to keep alive the memory of the Holocaust and the more than six million European Jews who were killed by Nazi Germany and to discuss the dangers of racism and intolerance.

The centre will co-operate with the Jerusalem- based Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial centre and the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC, among others.

Internationally recognised as a symbol of the Holocaust, the Auschwitz-Birkenau twin camps constituted Nazi Germany's largest death complex where nearly 1.5 million people, most of them European Jews, were either gassed, starved, shot or worked to death.

DPA

Subject: German news

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