Hitler 'had a Dutch Postbank account'

22nd July 2004, Comments 0 comments

22 July 2004, AMSTERDAM — Adolf Hitler had a secret account with the forerunner to the Postbank in the Netherlands shortly before the start of the Second World War, it was reported Thursday.

22 July 2004

AMSTERDAM — Adolf Hitler had a secret account with the forerunner to the Postbank in the Netherlands shortly before the start of the Second World War, it was reported Thursday.

Postbank is to investigate its archives after British author Cris Whetton discovered references to it in British secret service files.

Whetton made the find while doing research for his forthcoming book Hitler's Fortune, newspaper De Volkskrant said. The book investigates the extent of the Nazi dictator's fortune.

The Netherlands was neutral before Germany invaded in May 1940. More than 100,000 Jews — including many refugees from Nazi oppression in Germany — were deported to concentration camps. Only a few thousand survived the war.

Whetton's made his discovery when searching the archives for references to Eher Verlag, the German publisher of Hitler's book Mein Kampf and the Nazi party's newspaper Völkischer Beobachter.

"I found only two or three records by searching for "Eher Verlag" and decided to broaden the search by just looking for "Verlag", which was how I found the misspelled and wrongly indexed papers," Whetton said.

The writer found two documents which made reference to account number 211846, at the Nederlandse Post-, Cheque- en Girodienst, the forerunner to the Postbank. The account was in the name Eber Nachfolger from Munich, but a tax inspector at the time determined it "belonged to Herr Hitler".

Whetton also found a letters by a "Neville Bland" to a "William Strang". The first letter mentioned that a local tax inspector had discovered Hitler was the beneficiary "hiding behind" the Eber Nachfolger account.

Bland apologised that he did not have more information apart from the fact being a secret beneficiary was in contravention of the regulations.

Whetton tried, but failed to locate any other assets, such as houses or land, Hitler might have owned in the Netherlands.

Author Milja van Tielhof, who wrote a book about banks during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, told De Volkskrant that Whetton's discovery was significant.

As a neutral country up to 1940, many Germans, including Jews, opened bank accounts in the Netherlands. But little is known about Nazis who moved their money to the Netherlands, Van Tielhof said.

Whetton wrote to Postbank two years ago with questions about "Hitler's account" but never received a reply.

But Postbank has indicated that Eber Nachfolger's account was closed, but when and under what circumstances this happened remains unclear.

[Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news + German news + Adolf Hitler + Second World War

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