Happy G8 demonstrators claim victory at fence

8th June 2007, Comments 0 comments

8 June 2007, Heiligendamm, Germany (dpa) - Tired but happy demonstrators in Germany claimed victory Thursday after defying a government ban and shouting anti-G8 chants at a fence around the summit venue for two straight days. Using water jets from tanker trucks, police have let the crowds through and concentrated on stopping violence and keeping at least one access road to the Heiligendamm summit open at all times. "Out, out," chanted the protesters at the police. A protest leader, Christoph Kleine of Bloc

8 June 2007

Heiligendamm, Germany (dpa) - Tired but happy demonstrators in Germany claimed victory Thursday after defying a government ban and shouting anti-G8 chants at a fence around the summit venue for two straight days.

Using water jets from tanker trucks, police have let the crowds through and concentrated on stopping violence and keeping at least one access road to the Heiligendamm summit open at all times.

"Out, out," chanted the protesters at the police.

A protest leader, Christoph Kleine of Block G8, was exultant: "The 16,000 police hadn't a chance against the five-finger technique."

The five-finger method of attack requires marchers to split into five columns whenever confronted, confusing the police, who concentrate on stopping one or two groups only.

At the east gate of the summit compound, sealed off by a 12- kilometre-long fence, 400 protesters slept the first night of the blockade on rescue blankets on the ground, turning them into sun- shades in the daytime.

Every newly arrived protester from the distant tent villages won a round of applause. Helpers marching over the fields brought in sandwiches and bottled water and laid on a lunch of couscous and beetroot.

"Make yourselves at home," an organizer said by loud-speaker.

Somehow, the protesters managed to drive up a car carrying medicine and tampons.

"Some of the people have got terrible hay fever. Others are badly dehydrated," said Felix Vorwerk, a logistics manager for the protests managing transport from the camps to the blockade.

Villagers have also extended hospitality to the protesters.

"They have brought us free coffee and have filled our water bottles for us," said a 23-year-old woman student from Russia. A farmer had told the demonstrators they were welcome to dig a toilet in his field.

Elsewhere at the fence, police were absent for part of the day and were mainly concerned to keep at least one access gate open.

Demonstrators walked to the fence and videoed one another next to the razor-wire-topped barrier.

One girl filmed another as she said, "Hey look at me. Look where we got to!"

Holidaymakers and spectators also wandered around staring.

Police were mostly patient, giving repeated warnings before using force to clear critical locations.

When a clash broke out at the main gate, tense police shoved demonstrators. Columns of officers in padded clothing were moved up at the run to reinforce weakening lines.

A police loudspeaker warned, "Leave the road, or we'll use the water cannon." The demonstrators sat tight, and two trucks with powerful water jets on the roof and 9 tons of water in the tank began hosing the crowd.

DPA

Subject: German news

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