Hanover Fair aims to spark German economy

8th April 2005, Comments 0 comments

8 April 2005, HANOVER - Germany's giant Hanover Fair will once again be the showcase for the latest industrial and technological know-how from companies around the world, with a special focus on Russia as an increasingly important business partner.

8 April 2005

HANOVER - Germany's giant Hanover Fair will once again be the showcase for the latest industrial and technological know-how from companies around the world, with a special focus on Russia as an increasingly important business partner.

Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Russian President Vladimir Putin will officially open the fair in ceremonies on 10 April, with the massive fairgrounds to be open to the public 11-15 April.

The fair comes at a point when economic institutes and the European Union Commission have turned more pessimistic about Germany's growth prospects this year, with industry officials hoping the giant show will provide a spark to the domestic economy.

"Companies are actually doing well now, but things are going poorly at home," commented Hannes Hesse, managing director of the German machinery federation VDMA, noting the discrepancy between the bright export picture and the sluggish domestic economy.

Deutsche Messe AG, the fair company which runs the Hanover Fair, noted a mood of buoyancy in view of a strong rise in the number of exhibitors this year, especially from the Asia-Pacific region.

The company said 6,090 exhibitors had been lined up from 65 countries, some 1,000 exhibitors more than at the 2004 fair. More than 200,000 square metres of display space had been booked, compared with last year's 143,416 square metres, Deutsche Messe reported.

A total of 3,205 German firms will take part in this year's fair, making up the largest single country contingent. Among foreign exhibitors, Italy will lead with 449 firms, followed by China with 321 exhibits.

The Asia-Pacific region will account for a total of 695 exhibits, well up from last year's 448 companies.

Deutsche Messe chief executive Sepp D. Heckmann calls the Hanover Fair 2005 the most important technology event of the year worldwide.

"Our motto this year is 'One place to be' and the Hanover Fair is just that. This event has exerted a major influence on industry by encouraging innovation in all the sectors represented," he said.

"I am confident that the Hanover Fair will continue to be the leading technology show worldwide and, due to its focus on the entire value chain, will remain the most important event for decision-makers from all over the world," Heckmann added.

The giant industrial exhibition is organised into 11 leading international trade shows which cover among other subjects factory automation, microtechnology, research, energy, subcontracting and industrial services and equipment.

In addition, in a new feature the Hanover Fair will hold special 'industry days' putting the focus on specific themes to bring exhibitors and customers together.

"The thousand or so special events at the Hanover Fair make it the world's biggest forum for future-oriented technology worldwide," Heckmann said.

While the fair is a venue for world companies and their customers to get together, this year it will also have a special bilateral focus between Germany and Russia, the official partner country.

The Russian Federation exhibition will feature some 150 exhibitors showcasing their latest technology and products on a display area of 6,500 square metres. The focus will be on energy, transport and automation technology.

Russia has become a major energy supplier of oil and gas to Germany, but business officials say there is much greater potential for business cooperation between the two sides.

"We expect Russia to grow out of its role as a raw materials and energy supplier and present itself as a partner in technology," said Oliver Wieck, managing director of the Federation of German Industry's committee on Eastern Europe.

Russian ambassador to Germany Vladimir Kotenev said his country will be making an effort at the fair to attract investments.

He said more than 3,500 German firms are already active in Russia, whereby these are not only large-sized companies, but increasingly also medium-sized firms.

DPA

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article