Global distrust of US has widened

17th March 2004, Comments 0 comments

17 March 2004, PARIS - One year after the administration of US President George W. Bush attacked Iraq, global distrust of Washington has deepened, according to the results of a poll published Wednesday in the Paris-based International Herald Tribune (IHT).

17 March 2004

PARIS - One year after the administration of US President George W. Bush attacked Iraq, global distrust of Washington has deepened, according to the results of a poll published Wednesday in the Paris-based International Herald Tribune (IHT).

In France, Germany and even Britain, which was Washington’s primary ally in the conflict, favourable opinion of the United States has fallen since the war ended, the poll found.

The poll of more than 7,500 people in nine countries, conducted in late February and early March by the non-partisan Pew Research Center, also found that anger toward the United States was still fierce in Moslem countries.

In fact, so angry are Moslems at Washington that majorities in three countries—Jordan, Pakistan and Morocco—said they felt that suicide bombings against Americans and other Westerners in Iraq were justified.

However, anger against the Bush administration was also strong among European opponents of the war, such as France and Germany.

"There has been no healing of the wounds" provoked by differences over the Iraq conflict, said Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center in Washington.

In Britain, 58 percent of people asked now said they had a favourable view of the United States, a 12 percent drop since the question was last asked, in May 2003.

In France, positive opinion of the United States fell from 43 percent to 37 percent, while in Germany favourable views dropped to 38 percent from 45 percent.

In addition, majorities in all three countries said that as a result of the Iraq war they now distrusted the United States. In Britain 58 percent expressed mistrust of Washington, while 78 per cent held this opinion in France and 82 percent in Germany.

Asked if American and British leaders lied about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq or were misinformed by their intelligence services, a large majority of people asked in the nine countries said they believed that the leaders had lied.

That percentage was 82 percent in France, 69 percent in Germany and 61 percent in Russia.

Even in Britain, 41 percent of respondents said they believed British leaders had lied to them, while 48 percent said that Prime Minister Tony Blair and others in his government had been misinformed.

 

 DPA

Subject: German News 

0 Comments To This Article