Germany's greenhouse gas emissions increase

21st June 2005, Comments 0 comments

21 June 2005, COPENHAGEN - Greenhouse gas emissions from the European Union's 25 member states rose 1.5 per cent in 2003 on the back of increased coal burning, according to a report released on Tuesday by the European Environment Agency (EEA).

21 June 2005

COPENHAGEN - Greenhouse gas emissions from the European Union's 25 member states rose 1.5 per cent in 2003 on the back of increased coal burning, according to a report released on Tuesday by the European Environment Agency (EEA).

A rise in power production using coal and colder winter weather in some member countries contributed to the increase, said the E.U. agency at the launch of the report in Copenhagen.

Emissions from the 15 old member states increased by 1.3 per cent (53 million tonnes) in the same year.

Carbon dioxide emissions, which account for 80 per cent of all gas emissions from the 15 old member states, increased by 1.8 per cent (59 million tonnes).

Since 1990 CO2 emissions from the 15 old member states have increased by 3.4 per cent while in the same period greenhouse gas emissions have decreased by 1.7 per cent. Between 1999 and 2003 five- year average emissions fell 2.9 per cent below 1990 levels.

The Kyoto protocol, which uses 1990 levels to measure current emissions, aims for a five per cent reduction in base year levels by 2012.

The largest emission increases from electricity and heat production in 2003 were in Britain which produced an extra ten million tons.

Finland ranked second, producing an extra seven million tonnes of emissions while Germany came third with an additional six million tonnes.

The E.U. emissions trading scheme launched at the start of this year and other E.U. and national policies implemented since 2003, are expected to help member states reduce their emissions in line with the Kyoto protocol targets.

DPA

Subject: German news

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