Germany's great (toy) train robbers on trial

6th October 2005, Comments 0 comments

6 October 2005, ULM, GERMANY - A court in Germany Thursday heard how two men broke into the world's most famous toy train museum and made off with more than USD 1.5 million (EUR 1.2 million) worth of tiny engines, tenders, cabooses and layout equipment.

6 October 2005

ULM, GERMANY - A court in Germany Thursday heard how two men broke into the world's most famous toy train museum and made off with more than USD 1.5 million (EUR 1.2 million) worth of tiny engines, tenders, cabooses and layout equipment.

In all, 185 valuable pieces were stolen from the Maerklin Toy Museum in Goeppingen during the heist last January, prosecutors told judges of the Ulm State Court in Bavaria.

The loot included the legendary 'Storchenbein' engine, the world's oldest toy locomotive. Tinplate toy ships, cars and model steam engines were also stolen.

The two men, ages 27 and 50, face up to 10 years in prison for grand theft. They have entered guilty pleas. A third man faces extradition from Italy.

The trio short-circuited the museum's security alarms and broke into the museum on January 18, ransacking display cases and taking everything they could carry.

They were able to sell a portion of their booty for about 60,000 dollars on the black market in Vienna. Austrian authorities thwarted a second attempt to unload the stolen goods and arrested the pair last March. All of the toys were recovered.

Proceedings continue October 17.

DPA

Subject: German news

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